2011 Q4Q Winners: REGIONAL LTL


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Source: Logistics Management, Peerless Media Research Group

Staying nimble and quick
The mantra for profitability in the LTL market remains freight density, cost control, and pricing discipline. However, the nimblest regional LTL carriers can often understand their costs better than the more broad-reaching nationals and, therefore, price business to earn an appropriate return.

According to the readers of Logistics Management, not only have these 13 LTL’s figured out a sustainable business model, but also rank far and away the best in servicing their particular regions. In the Northeast/Mid-Atlantic region, A. Duie Pyle (48.87), Pitt Ohio (47.81), and New Penn (46.77) scored above the weighted average this year. Of note, A. Duie Pyle’s impressive 48.87 was the second highest weighted average in the entire regional LTL category.

In the South/South Central region, shippers gave highest marks to Southeastern Freight Lines (48.01), Averitt Express (46.84), and Wilson Trucking (46.53). In the Midwest/North Central region, Dayton Freight Lines (46.59) and Holland (45.80) repeat as the only two scoring above the weighted average.

Out West, Oak Harbor Freight Lines (46.59) and Lynden Transport (46.57), the only two winners from our 2010 results, are joined by leading scorer Pacific Alaska (50.69), Carlile Transportation (46.39), and Reddaway (45.73).


2011 Quest for Quality Winners Categories

NATIONAL LTL | REGIONAL LTL | TRUCKLOAD | RAIL/INTERMODAL
OCEAN CARRIERS | 3PL | AIR CARRIERS | FREIGHT FORWARDERS


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