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30th Annual Salary Survey: Reeling in the talent

Our 2014 survey finds that large companies are boosting their initial salary offerings for new hires by as much as 10 percent. Will this trend help close the logistics talent gap?
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
April 01, 2014

Joel Sutherland, managing director of the Supply Chain Management Institute at the University of San Diego says that there is clear frustration related to staying in the same position or job function for too long—if not for an entire career.

“This can lead to employee turnover when they search outside to gain a richer supply chain experience,” Sutherland says. “Companies, large and small, need to provide and communicate a clear advancement plan for their employees if they want to retain this talent. As evidence, it appears that 69 percent of the LM salary survey respondents are either passively or actively looking for new opportunities.”

Mike Burnette, associated director of The Global Supply Chain Institute at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, says that sincerity and recognition of what it takes to keep logistics managers happy is also changing.

According to Burnette, many logistics leaders scratch their heads trying to figure out the new supply chain recruits, those we define as Generation Y, born between 1977 and 1994. “They’re a diverse, technology-wise, and sophisticated generation. To keep them engaged, given their shorter attention spans, Generation Y must be challenged.”

And because the survey clearly conveys respondents’ strong desire to raise their salaries, employers should encourage them to pursue ongoing education, says Dr. Bruce Arntzen, executive director of the supply chain management program at the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics.

“Staying ahead of the learning curve will keep young logistics managers on a positive salary trajectory,” says Arntzen. “This year’s survey clearly points to that trend.”

About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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Article Topics

Features · April 2014 · Salary Survey · All topics

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