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A closer look at lift truck fleet management

New lift truck fleet management offerings aim to improve flexibility and efficiency in a dynamic business climate, creating efficiencies in the most unlikely places.
By Josh Bond, Contributing Editor
January 14, 2011

When times were good, lift trucks and their associated costs didn’t inspire much scrutiny. These warehouse workhorses chugged along, dropped in and out of the maintenance bay, and were replaced every so often by newer, shinier models.

Lately, as many savvy warehouse/DC mangers have keenly noticed, current business conditions tend to reward those who apply a magnifying glass to each and every nook. According to Scott McLeod, president of Fleetman Consulting, Inc., an independent forklift fleet management company, fleet management practices are about due for their moment in the spotlight.

If McLeod is right, and if the assortment of third-party offerings is any indication, site managers and corporate number crunchers will find their warehouse workhorses could stand to slim down. Old habits die hard, but McLeod says he’s confident that a thoughtful examination of fleets of all sizes will yield dividends for most organizations.

For the complete PDF Feature Article, click on the link below.

Click below for related articles. 

WDC: LIft trucks get smarter
Lift trucks: Solving the financial puzzle

About the Author

Josh Bond
Contributing Editor

Josh Bond is a contributing editor to Modern. In addition to working on Modern’s annual Casebook and being a member of the Show Daily team, Josh covers lift trucks for the magazine.


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