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AAPA to examine change in vessel deployments

“As we look back on the challenges of a difficult couple of years and ahead on how trade can spur economic recovery and future growth, we must begin now developing and implementing policy and programs that will sustain and improve critical gateways for global trade,” said Kurt Nagle, AAPA president and CEO.
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
January 10, 2011

When the American Association of Port Authorities (AAPA) holds its fourth annual “Shifting International Trade Routes Seminar” in Tampa next month, more than a few speakers will be sounding the call for more infrastructure.

“As we look back on the challenges of a difficult couple of years and ahead on how trade can spur economic recovery and future growth, we must begin now developing and implementing policy and programs that will sustain and improve critical gateways for global trade,” said Kurt Nagle, AAPA president and CEO. “For the U.S., by raising the priority of seaports and their connecting infrastructure in the federal agenda, America can modernize its seaports and intermodal connections to help make the nation more internationally competitive in an increasingly fierce global trading environment.”

The event, scheduled for February 1-2, is co-sponsored by the U.S. Maritime Administration the Tampa Port Authority. It will address how the various players in the freight transportation industry view the fallout of the recent economic downturn.  It will also focus on how trade patterns and infrastructure needs will be affected by the expansion of the Panama Canal that is currently underway.

“For the U.S., by raising the priority of seaports and their connecting infrastructure in the federal agenda, America can modernize its seaports and intermodal connections to help make the nation more internationally competitive in an increasingly fierce global trading environment.”

He further noted that the discussion “will add layers of information and insight to help the seaport industry better position itself for future growth and success.”

Among those slated to speak is Dick Steinke, executive director, Port of Long Beach. If he is to make a case for more spending in Southern California, he has the support of Joel Anderson,?president and CEO of International Warehouse Logistics Association.

“Competition for international trade is changing as the global recession caused shippers and receivers to reevaluate their supply chains,” he said. “For the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, this means restoring their reputation as freight friendly distribution points and mini-bridge centers.”

Anderson added that the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach need to act quickly “before ports elsewhere use the current reputation of the southern California ports” to shift the focus of Asian import trade from the West Coast to other ports in the U.S., Mexico and Canada.

“Although West Coast ports handled nearly 70 percent of the traffic coming from Asia until recently, the reanalysis away from southern California ports will gain because of the widening of the Panama Canal,” he said.

About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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