AAR reports carload and intermodal gains for week ending January 25

Carloads—at 280,761—were up 5.6 percent, and intermodal—at 245,883—was up 3 percent.

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The Association of American Railroads (AAR) reported this week that carload and intermodal volumes were both up again for the week ending January 24. 

Carloads—at 280,761—were up 5.6 percent year-over-year and below the week ending January 17 at 289,825 and ahead of the week ending January 11 at 256,849 and the week ending January 4 at 246,846.

Intermodal—at 245,883—was up 3 percent annually and below the week ending January 17 at 267,428 and ahead of the weeks ending January 11 and January 4 at 235,987 and 186,878, respectively.

Of the ten main commodity groups tracked by the AAR, seven saw annual increases for the week ending January 25.

Grain products were up 23,715 carloads or 24.4 percent, and petroleum and petroleum products were up 15,211 carloads or 24.4 percent.

For the first four weeks of 2014, carloads are up 0.9 percent at 1,074,281, and intermodal is up 1.8 percent at 936,176 trailers and containers.


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Article Topics

AAR · Carload · Intermodal · All Topics
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