AAR says weekly volumes show slight gains

Rail traffic was up slightly for the week ending July 23, according to data released by the Association of American Railroads (AAR).

By ·

Rail traffic was up slightly for the week ending July 23, according to data released by the Association of American Railroads (AAR).

Carload volume—at 291,909—was up 01.4 percent annually and ahead of the week ending July 16 at 281,389 and the week ending July 9 at 245,574. It was also behind the week ending April 2, which hit 305,905 carloads, marking the highest weekly carload tally since the end of 2008.

Carload volume was up 0.7 percent in the East and up 1.8 percent out West. Carloads on a year-to-date basis are at 8,358,097 for a 2.4 percent annual increase.

Intermodal came in at 232,181 trailers and containers, ahead of the week ending July 16 at 230,324 and the week ending July 9 at 192,619.The two highest weeks of the year were the weeks ending June 17 and June 10 reaching 237,682 and 237,422, respectively.

Intermodal volumes on a year-to-date basis at 6,511,257 are up 7 percent compared to 2010.

Of the 20 commodity groups tracked by the AAR, 12 were up annually. Iron and steel scrap was up 24.5 percent, and metallic ores were up 53.2 percent.

Estimated ton-miles for the week were 33.5 billion for a 1.5 percent annual increase, and
on a year-to-date basis, the 936.6 billion ton-miles recorded were up 3.4 percent.


Subscribe to Logistics Management Magazine!

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Article Topics

AAR · Intermodal · Rail Freight · All Topics
Latest Whitepaper
The Internet of Things and the Modern Supply Chain
Learn today how the internet of things is transforming supply chain operations.
Download Today!
From the February 2017 Issue
As the new administration sends waves of uncertainly through the global trade community, this could be the best time ever for shippers to build an investment case for GTM. Here are five trends you need to watch if you’re about to put these savvy systems to work
Carrier Consolidation Keeps Shippers Guessing
Getting Value from the Cloud
View More From this Issue
Subscribe to Our Email Newsletter
Sign up today to receive our FREE, weekly email newsletter!
Latest Webcast
Transforming Supply Chains into True Global Trade Networks
The traditional supply chain model does not have the flexibility to adapt when constrained capacity, fluctuating demand, and political trade uncertainties affect the market. In this webcast we’ll explore a more modern approach to supply chain that moves away from a traditional logistics model and embraces a global trade network (GTN) model.
Register Today!
EDITORS' PICKS
ASEAN Logistics: Building Collectively
While most of the world withdraws inward, Southeast Asia is practicing effective cooperation between...
2017 Rate Outlook: Will the pieces fall into place?
Trade and transport analysts see a turnaround in last year’s negative market outlook, but as...

Logistics Management’s Top Logistics News Stories 2016
From mergers and acquisitions to regulation changes, Logistics Management has compiled the most...
Making the TMS Decision: Ariens Finds Just the Right Fit
The third time is the charm for this U.S. manufacturer on the hunt for a third-party logistics (3PL)...