Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!


Air cargo shippers still waiting for new Boeing freighter’s debut

At issue, it seems, is a contract negotiation with one of the manufacturer’s key clients – Cargolux.
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
September 19, 2011

Shippers anticipating the launch of Boeing’s the 747-8 Freighter have been disappointed by the cancellation today.

At issue, it seems, is a contract negotiation with one of the manufacturer’s key clients – Cargolux.

“We know that Cargolux was bringing in a lot of journalists to cover this event,” said Tom Crabtree, who oversees Boeing’s cargo industry forecasting effort. In an interview with LM, he noted that demand for this capacity has been ramping up.

“The make-up of the world’s freighter fleet will change as fuel efficiency continues to be an imperative, leading to an emphasis on size,” he said. “However the resultant fleet structure may be more nuanced.”
In this case, said analysts, the “nuance” involved the refusal by Cargolux to accept delivery. Published reports contend that the disagreement between Boeing and the airline may also involve compensation for Qatar Airways – which owns 35 percent of Cargolux. Quatar was promised 787 Dreamliner aircraft which have yet to arrive.

According to the just-published Boeing “Current Market Outlook 2011-2030,” long term economic projections are fraught with difficulty.

“Many of the assumptions such as regional and national GDP growth underlying Boeing’s projections are highly variable, influenced by short-term factors,” said Crabtree.  “None-the-less, looking at Boeing’s numbers, the growth of air cargo volumes over the past thirty years appears to be remarkably constant; despite the volatility of the underlying economy.”

Admittedly, said Boeing, the structure of the air freight market will change, with emerging markets and longer-range trades becoming even more important; yet a forecast of 5.6 percent does not appear to be unreasonable in the light of historical data.

“If true the air freight sector might prove to be a quite attractive niche within the wider logistics industry,” Crabtree said.

About the Author

image
Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

The index ISM uses to measure non-manufacturing growth—known as the NMI—was 56.0 in June, which edged out May by 0.3 percent.

Regardless of the date or year, one thing is beyond consistent when it comes to key themes in freight transportation logistics: the state of United States highways and related transportation infrastructure is in an eternal state of chaos and disrepair.

The high-volume warehouse or distribution center that supports B2B, Omni-channel activities, direct-to-consumer shipments, and the Internet of Things all require a flexible and scalable supply chain in order to function at optimal capacity. The problem is that most of today's supply chains are made up of fragmented silos of information that compromise their ability to compete, be responsive to customer demands or seize new business opportunities.

As customers' demands constantly evolve, transportation and logistics (T&L) operations are being put under growing pressure to offer more efficient delivery services, while not compromising on customer service. Using findings from a research survey conducted among transport and logistics managers around the world, this report explores how a combination of mobile technology implementations for mobile workers, and process re-engineering efforts can elevate operations to the next level.

It's a fact - most best-of-breed WMS providers force you to pay every time you require a system change. Uncover five more dirty secrets many warehouse management systems providers don't want you to know. Download the white paper 5 Dirty Secrets of Warehouse Management Systems to discover these hidden truths and gain valuable information on considerations for evaluating WMS vendors.

Article Topics

News · Air Cargo · Air Freight · Global · All topics

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2015 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA