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American Association of Port Authorities deserves praise for latest achievement

The importance of seaport-related infrastructure has not been lost on U.S. President Barack Obama, who announced seven projects of national and regional significance yesterday
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
July 20, 2012

The importance of seaport-related infrastructure has not been lost on U.S. President Barack Obama, who announced seven projects of national and regional significance yesterday. All will benefit from aggressive federal permit decision-making and review schedules. 

Each of these projects directly support vital logistical hubs and their ability to move freight efficiently to reduce costs to consumers, create jobs, and help America’s manufacturing and agricultural industries sell their goods overseas.

Much of the credit for achieving this federal mandate goes to the American Association of Port Authorities (AAPA) , which has tirelessly lobbied for our nation’s ocean cargo load centers.

Fourteen projects, including highway, bridge, transit, water supply and other projects were initially identified by the administration last October.  In a March, 2012 Executive Order, the president formally directed federal agencies to identify nationally or regionally significant infrastructure projects and set aggressive schedules for completing the necessary federal permit and review decisions associated with each project. ??The projects announced yesterday are the first seven of 43 additional projects that will be expedited under the Executive Order.  The names of the other projects will be announced in the coming weeks.?

?The seven projects include five harbor improvements to deepen federal navigation channels for larger ships (in Jacksonville, Miami, Charleston, Savannah and New York/New Jersey), a project to increase the height of the New York harbor’s Bayonne Bridge to enhance navigation, and an intermodal container facility in Jacksonville to increase rail capacity.

About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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