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Consumer Goods Manufacturers Seek Greater Supply Chain Flexibility

Uncovering Packaging and Distribution Efficiency Opportunities
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This White Paper explains why Fast Moving Consumer Goods manufacturers need more flexible supply chain solutions post-recession.




November 17, 2010

Over the past few decades Fast Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG) companies have been forced to react to a multitude of changing market dynamics.

The mergers and acquisitions era created strong competitors and rapid growth for many companies, but resulted in complex and costly logistics infrastructures.

And, the growth in big box retailing and e-commerce placed increased attention on the consumer shopping experience, creating a shift in the balance of power from the manufacturer to the retailer.

At the same time, the technology and manufacturing boom was giving rise to developing economies in Asia and Latin America, creating new consumers and growth opportunities for FMCG manufacturers and retailers alike.

While top-line growth was enticing in these emerging markets, lack of infrastructure, dispersed populations and cultural nuances created challenges for even the best manufacturing and logistics planners seeking to establish operations and capture market share quickly and profitably.

While each of these dynamics influenced how FMCG manufacturers and retailers went to market, the economic fluctuations experienced around the world in recent years have most dramatically impacted growth and operating strategies.

To learn more about strategies FMCG manufacturers can adopt to meet retailers’ needs and grow their businesses, simply fill-out the information below and download our FREE White Paper.



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