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Consumer goods suppliers identify $3 million in potential annual savings

Report highlights executives' focus on direct store delivery processes.
By Josh Bond, Contributing Editor
April 24, 2014

A new report from Honeywell has found that millions of dollars can be saved by evaluating and improving direct store delivery (DSD) operations – namely the way that products are ordered, sold, delivered and merchandised.

“We saw a need for additional information and released this study to focus specifically on DSD,” said Brian Schulte, industry director for direct store delivery for Honeywell, in a recent interview. “In looking for confirmation about whether DSD as a model continues to be important, the message came through strongly; many customers see the value in staying close to the consumer from a competitive standpoint.”

The report contains feedback from 350 C-level consumer goods executives and directors from across the globe. Results indicate that 49% of organizations feel increased transportation costs have severely impacted profit margins in the past 12 months. But those organizations that have carried out process evaluations in the past year to improve their DSD processes have cut, or expect to cut, costs on average by $734,000 annually.

Click here to read the full story on the Modern Materials Handling website.

About the Author

Josh Bond
Contributing Editor

Josh Bond is a contributing editor to Modern. In addition to working on Modern’s annual Casebook and being a member of the Show Daily team, Josh covers lift trucks for the magazine.


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