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Container lines making daily adjustments to Japan service

Ships advised to keep 200 nautical miles from the area near damaged nuclear reactors where increased radiation levels have been detected
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
March 21, 2011

Spokesmen for the International Maritime Organization (IMO) told LM that container lines are making daily adjustments to their deployment schedules to and from Japan.

“We are not aware of any ships being advised to cease service,” said the London-based spokesman, who added that the IMO is providing daily updates.

In Copenhagen, meanwhile, spokesmen for Maersk are saying that operations “are running as normal with the exception of certain ports like Sendai, Onahama, and Hachinohe, which suffered severe damages.”

Spokesmen added, however that this is subject to change:

“Depending on how the situation develops it may be decided to deviate vessels.”

Similarly, NOL in Singapore, is telling its shippers that they are declining bookings to the same locations in Japan because operational facilities are inaccessible or unavailable due to earthquake or tsunami damage.

“We are currently unable to move or deliver cargo to many locations in Japan according to original delivery schedules. This is due to interrupted rail, road and barge networks in northeastern Japan,” said NOL. “We are notifying customers in those circumstances.”

NOL has also established new routings to ensure that their vessels at sea remain 200 nautical miles from the area near damaged nuclear reactors where increased radiation levels have been detected.

“We are not transporting cargo into the area near the reactors, nor are we taking cargo from that area,” said spokesmen.

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About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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