Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!


Crossing international borders with confidence


September 06, 2012

Although most businesses are eagerly looking forward to increased growth over the next two years, many say they are concerned that confusion over complex customs regulations could hamper that success, according to a survey of smallto medium-sized businesses. The survey turned up some surprising new findings, notably that some companies are gambling with their business by simply ignoring international trade regulations. Also, less than half feel extremely or very comfortable targeting new international markets – meaning they are missing out on profitable global opportunities.

Fortunately, it’s relatively easy for companies to avoid being caught in a web of customs complexity. Here are some tips from customs broker and trade consultant Livingston International on how to move smoothly from costly confusion to confident compliance.

image

Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

The Department of Transportation’s Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) reported this week that U.S. trade with its North America Free Trade Agreement partners Canada and Mexico in March dropped 5.3 percent annually to $96.1 billion.

U.S. carloads were down 9.1 percent annually at 273,387, and intermodal volume was up 4.3 percent annually at 281,090 containers and trailers.

NRF's Jonathan Gold explains that the past year was replete with disruptions, slowdowns and partial shutdown, which can no longer be the norm, saying ports and dockworkers must adapt to ensure they provide shippers with the predictability and stability they need.

Last month, I gave a presentation to a group of senior transportation and supply chain executives. It was entitled “Predictable Surprises,” because it addressed how transportation and supply chain professionals can eliminate unpleasant surprises by looking at and evaluating issues in the transportation industry, and projecting how those issues will affect their companies.

The Port of Los Angeles (POLA) and the Port of Long Beach (POLB) said this week that they have formally established working groups, which they said will aim to seek new supply chain efficiencies, and focus on various aspects of port operations, including peak operations and terminal optimization in an effort to augment the San Pedro Bay port complex.

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2015 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA