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Crossing international borders with confidence


September 06, 2012

Although most businesses are eagerly looking forward to increased growth over the next two years, many say they are concerned that confusion over complex customs regulations could hamper that success, according to a survey of smallto medium-sized businesses. The survey turned up some surprising new findings, notably that some companies are gambling with their business by simply ignoring international trade regulations. Also, less than half feel extremely or very comfortable targeting new international markets – meaning they are missing out on profitable global opportunities.

Fortunately, it’s relatively easy for companies to avoid being caught in a web of customs complexity. Here are some tips from customs broker and trade consultant Livingston International on how to move smoothly from costly confusion to confident compliance.

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