Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!



CSCMP to unveil new three-stage certification

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
October 02, 2011

The Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP) will unveil its new certification program, SCPro, at its annual conference this week in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The event will be held October 2-5, 2011, at the Pennsylvania Convention Center.

The SCPro program is a rigorous, three-level certification that offers global supply chain management professionals a way to demonstrate a broad range of industry skills and mastery of end-to-end supply chain functions.

“We are extremely excited to unveil CSCMP’s groundbreaking certification program at our annual conference,” said Rick Blasgen, CSCMP president and chief executive officer. “Our members overwhelmingly asked us to develop a comprehensive certification that diligently measured and accurately reflected an individual’s skills and knowledge across the entire supply chain.”

The program’s three levels are as follows:
• Level One: Cornerstones of Supply Chain Management SCPro Level One covers the entire end-to-end supply chain with a focus On building customer relationships. This level is open to candidates who have either a bachelor’s degree or four years of relevant experience.
• Level Two: Analysis and Application of Supply Chain Challenges This level tests a candidate’s ability to thoughtfully analyze real world case studies and formulate supply chain solutions which improve the supply chain
in the short and long term.

• Level Three: Implementation of Supply Chain Transformation The highest SCPro designation requires an unprecedented use of practical application, and marks the candidate as a leader who is not only valuable within his or her organization, but also of value to the profession.

“The SCPro certification will enable professionals to demonstrate to their employers that they are the kind of leaders who will positively impact their organizations’ bottom lines,” said Judy Schieve, manager of certification programs. “When a candidate completes all three levels of the program, he or she will also have a portfolio of work to augment his professional experience.”

The supply chain management profession has evolved dramatically over the past few decades, added Blasgen.

“Today’s supply chain requires multidisciplinary capabilities, demonstrable and quantifiable success, and continuous study of the field. CSCMP’s SCPro certification provides professionals with an exceptional program that will help them demonstrate 21st century supply chain management skills and expertise.”

About the Author

image
Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

The 'Internet of Things' or IoT is a term that has rapidly taken center stage in business and consumer technology circles, with tremendous amounts of hype in both. Don't be distracted if some of the hypothetical consumer examples of the IoT seem far-fetched; the trend has serious implications for businesses. This complimentary whitepaper takes a look at some of the opportunities afforded by the Internet of Business Things.

Of special interest to readers of Logistics Management will be “Americas Update,” which will look into the future of the market in the Americas and assess how firms will be able to favorably position themselves to compete and win market share.

After 20 years, two congressional mandates and countless lawsuits and lobbying efforts, safety advocates and the Teamsters union still say there are too many inexperienced rookie truck drivers hitting the road without sufficient behind-the-wheel training.

Congested U.S. port terminals, harbor and over-the-road truck and driver shortages, slower trains and longer rail terminal dwell times due to increased domestic rates have not only disrupted service but also driven intermodal rates and cargo handling costs up sharply.

Southern California shippers are getting a break on container dwell expenses for the next ten days as the Port of Long Beach announced that it had added an extra three days to the time that overseas import containers can remain on the docks without charge.

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2013 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA