Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!


Diesel prices fall for the sixth straight week, reports EIA

By Jeff Berman, Group News Editor
July 02, 2013

Diesel prices took a downward turn for the sixth straight week, falling 2.1 cents to $3.817 per gallon, according to the Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration (EIA).

The 2.1 cent drop marks the steepest decline of the year to date.

In the previous five weeks, prices dropped 0.3 cents, 0.8 cents, 2 cents, 1.1 cents, and 1 cent, respectively, over the previous five weeks for a cumulative 7.3 cent decline.

The four straight weeks of declines were preceded by a two-week stretch which saw prices rise a cumulative 4.5 cents. And 2 cent decline two weeks ago was the largest decline since a 3.6 cent decline during the week of April 29, according to EIA data.

Prior to the two-week stretch of increases, diesel prices declined for ten straight weeks and dropped a cumulative 31.4 cents. Prior to the previous ten weeks of declining prices, diesel prices rose a cumulative 26.5 cents over a six week span. And on an annual basis, the average price per gallon is up 16.9 cents.

Regardless of the fluctuation in diesel prices, shippers are cognizant of the impact diesel prices can have on their bottom line—for better or worse.

And they continue to be proactive on that front, too, by taking steps to reduce mileage and transit lengths when possible as well as cut down on empty miles. And even through shippers want to adjust budgets in order to offset the increased costs higher fuel prices bring, it is not always an easy thing to manage.

Shippers have told LM that adjusting budgets is only part of the solution when it comes to dealing—and living—with fuel price fluctuation. 

UPS Freight President Jack Holmes said at the eyefortransport 3PL Summit that
fuel increases too need to be taken into account as part of the shipper-carrier relationship.

“A carrier who is a partner simply passing expenses on to [a shipper] is not in my opinion a carrier you want to do business with,” said Holmes. “The one you want to do business with is the one who will tell you ‘this is what has happened and here is what we will do to mitigate that expense’ and hopefully you do things on fuel efficiency and idle time that get you closer to negating the impact of those things on your business but those are the differences between a vendor relationship and a partner relationship—which does things to help each other.”

About the Author

Jeff Berman headshot
Jeff Berman
Group News Editor

Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Key sanctions are unlikely to be fully removed until Congress lifts the U.S. embargo on Cuba – something unlikely to take place before 2018 when incumbent president Raúl Castro is expected to step down

The PMI, the ISM’s index to measure growth inched up 0.7 percent to 53.5 over May’s 52.8. This reading marks sequential growth for the third month in a row, which was preceded by five months of sequential declines.

Foreign direct investment has never been more important in catalyzing growth, whether in the developed or developing world. Although equity markets around the world have largely recovered since the financial crisis, global capital flows have contracted sharply.

When it comes to the chances of the December 31, 2015 Positive Train Control (PTC) deadline being extended, something which railroads say is badly needed, it appears they need to be prepared to be disappointed. That was the chief takeaway of a statement from Sarah Feinberg, acting administrator of the United States Department of Transportation’s Federal Railroad Administration (FRA).

It’s said that innovation will lead the economy out of its current funk. But how does an organization become a perpetually innovative company? That’s one of the questions Kai Engel and his co-authors at A.T. Kearney set out to answer in their new book Masters Of Innovation.

Article Topics

News · EIA · Diesel Prices · All topics

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2015 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA