Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!


Diesel prices hit highest level since April, says Energy Information Administration

By Jeff Berman, Group News Editor
September 05, 2012

Diesel prices moved up 3.8 cents to $4.127 per gallon, according to the Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration (EIA).

This marks the ninth straight week diesel prices have increased and the third straight week the price per gallon has been above the $4 mark, which had not previously been reached since hitting $4.026 per gallon the week of May 14. This week’s price matches the previous high of $4.127 per gallon from the week of April 16.

Prior to these recent gains, diesel prices sank for 12 straight weeks, falling a cumulative 50 cents during that period. On an annual basis, the price per gallon of diesel is up 25.9 cents.

In its recently updated short-term energy outlook, the EIA is calling for diesel prices to average $3.84 per gallon in 2012 and $3.62 in 2013 (down from previous estimates of $3.90 and $3.87, respectively), with WTI crude oil expected to hit $93.90 per barrel in 2012 and $90.25 in 2013 (down from previous estimates of $96.80 and $97.00, respectively).

Regardless of the fluctuation in diesel prices, shippers are cognizant of the impact diesel prices can have on their bottom line—for better or worse. And they continue to be proactive on that front, too, by taking steps to reduce mileage and transit lengths when possible as well as cut down on empty miles.

What’s more, shippers have repeatedly told LM they are constantly monitoring fuel prices, as they relate to freight rates and the overall costs of doing business.

And shippers continue to take steps to minimize the impact of fluctuating fuel costs. Over the years, they have maintained that this is imperative as higher diesel prices have the potential to hinder growth and increase operating costs, which will, in turn, force them to raise rates and offset the increased prices to consumers.

Crude oil barrel prices on the New York Mercantile Exchange were $94.42 at press time. The Associated Press reported that signs that manufacturing around the globe is weakening, which suggests a drop in fuel demand, weighed on oil prices.

About the Author

Jeff Berman headshot
Jeff Berman
Group News Editor

Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

During this webcast our panelist offer logistics and supply chain professionals a “reality check” when it comes to our current state of understanding, adoption, and utilization of the technological tools that are available to improve our operations.

The index ISM uses to measure non-manufacturing growth—known as the NMI—was 55.7 in April (a level of 50 or higher indicates growth), which was up 1.2 percent compared to March, with economic activity in the non-manufacturing sector growing for the 75th consecutive month.

Total gross first quarter revenue for XPO was up 404.4 percent annually to $3.5 billion, with net revenue up 510.5 percent to $1.6 billion. While gross and net revenue were up, the company reported a net loss of $23.2 million, or $0.21 per diluted share and an adjusted net loss attributable to common shareholders of $9.3 million or $0.08 per share.

Regardless of capacity, pricing, or the economy, trucking industry regulations are never far from the freight transportation limelight. That is especially evident when it comes to the federally mandated hours-of-service (HOS) regulations. As usual, the current state of HOS remains somewhat fluid. And the reason for that has to do with legislation coming from the Senate Transportation Appropriations legislation that is currently being considered by the Senate.

At last week’s NASSTRAC Conference in Orlando, Fla., LM Group News Editor Jeff Berman caught up with Jack Holmes, president of UPS Freight, the less-than-truckload subsidiary of UPS. On June 30, Holmes will retire from UPS after a 37-year career with Big Brown that saw him rise from the overnight docks in Philadelphia to the executive suite in Richmond, Va.

Article Topics

News · EIA · Diesel Prices · Diesel · All topics

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2016 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA