Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!



Documentary on ocean cargo shipping is pure film noir

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
March 05, 2012

While many creative visual artists support our position on the positive impact of globalization, there are some mainstream film-makers taking a contrarian view.

The Forgotten Space follows container cargo aboard ships, barges, trains and trucks, listening to workers, engineers, planners, politicians, and those marginalized by the global transport system. We visit displaced farmers and villagers in Holland and Belgium, underpaid truck drivers in Los Angeles, seafarers aboard mega-ships shuttling between Asia and Europe, and factory workers in China, whose low wages are the fragile key to the whole puzzle. And in Bilbao, we discover the most sophisticated expression of the belief that the maritime economy, and the sea itself, is somehow obsolete.

Noël Burch, film-maker and theoretician of the cinema, and Allan Sekula, experimenter in images, set out to discover in the sea and its symbolism.

Using a range of materials – descriptive documentary, interviews, archive stills and footage, clips from old moviesm – they provide us with an essayistic, visual documentary about the dark side of containerization.

About the Author

image
Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

For November, which is the most recent month for which data is available, the SCI came in at -3.2. While this is still entrenched in negative territory, it represents an improvement over October and September, which were -5.5 and -6.6, respectively.

Total December shipments––at 1,150,810––were 3 percent better than November and up 5 percent annually. And total 2014 shipments––at 14,092,551––were up 5.61 percent, setting a new record for annual shipments during the time which Panjiva has been collecting this data since 2007.

The biggest story in the energy sector has to be the 30% decline in oil prices since June to a level not seen since the global recession cut a whopping 6% from global consumption back in 2009.

The challenge for air cargo operators to fill capacity, and the confidence to add capacity, remain the same as the demand curve for air freight services recovers.

For the fourth quarter of 2014, UPS said it anticipates adjusted diluted earnings per share of roughly $1.25, with full-year 2014 adjusted diluted earnings per share at $4.75, which represents a 3.9 percent annual gain over 2013’s adjusted earnings per share of $4.57, with full-year 2014 diluted earnings pegged at around $3.28 per share, which is 28.9 percent below 2013’s $4.61.

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2013 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA