Education: Associated partners with Robert Morris University

Associated partners with Robert Morris University’s Morris Graduate School of Management to increase awareness about the Materials Handling Industry

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In an effort to increase awareness about the value that the materials handling industry provides to the supply chain, Associated has partnered with Robert Morris University’s (RMU) Morris Graduate School of Management in an experiential learning project.

Robert Morris University is known as the “Experience University” and therefore this project was a perfect fit for their graduate students working on their Master’s in Business Administration. Their approach is to engage students in evaluating and analyzing real world issues to reinforce and embed some of the skills they have acquired in their course curriculum.

Over the span of this ten week project, eight students were asked to define the role of certain employees in executing the company’s new branding initiative and recommend how these
employees should be engaged and trained to meet the expectations of the new initiative. To accomplish this, students studied the industry, the company and the applicable employee’s
current role and function. At the culmination of this project they presented their findings to their professor, members of RMU Administration and a group of Associated Senior Managers
including, Michael B. Romano, President/CEO. In appreciation of the student’s efforts, Associated has made a contribution to the RMU Endowment Fund.

“We are grateful to Associated for allowing our students the opportunity to work with them,” said Dr. Kayed Akkawi, RMU Dean of the Morris Graduate School of Management. “RMU’s relationship with Associated was an essential factor that made this Graduate course a success.”

“In addition to the great ideas and valuable insight these students provided, this project served as a platform to create awareness and appreciation of our industry. Increasing exposure to the
academic community will ensure the availability of a continuing pool of talent that will sustain the industry’s growth and success as well serve to educate future decision makers as to the
value we bring to the buyers and users of our products and services,” said Michael B. Romano, President/CEO, of Associated. “We are grateful for the opportunity to work with RMU in this
mutually beneficial endeavor.”


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