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Emerging technologies helping seaports stay green

The technology, called the EcoCrane, is on the U.S. EPA’s list of emerging technologies aimed at advancing clean diesel technology and expertise.
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
August 04, 2010

The Port of Los Angeles has been awarded a $731,000 grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) to purchase and test new technology that could significantly reduce diesel emissions and greenhouse gases from rubber tired gantry cranes, which are used for stacking containers.

The technology, called the EcoCrane, is on the U.S. EPA’s list of emerging technologies aimed at advancing clean diesel technology and expertise.

The EcoCrane technology involves replacing a conventional 685-horsepower diesel engine on a rubber tired gantry crane with a downsized 105-horsepower diesel engine that charges a battery pack.  The battery pack drives an electric motor that powers the gantry operation.  Because the engine runs only periodically to maintain the battery charge, the EcoCrane can reduce particulate matter (PM) up to 85 percent and greenhouse gases up to 70 percent.

The Port of Los Angeles is partnering on the project with West Basin Container Terminal at the Port, as well as Ports America, the largest terminal operator and stevedore company in the Americas.
Produced by EcoPower Hybrid Systems, the EcoCrane will be tested over the next 12 months by Ports America at the West Basin Container Terminal to verify the projected emission reductions by the U.S. EPA.  If the test is a success, the Port will consider requiring the EcoCrane technology when future terminal leases are renewed. 

The grant was awarded under the U.S. EPA’s emerging technologies program to promote diesel emission reductions.  The program focuses on advancing new, cutting-edge technologies not yet certified by the U.S. EPA, but that show promise and warrant further evaluation.

About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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