Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!


Global Port Tracker report calls for slow growth in 2011

By Jeff Berman, Group News Editor
February 22, 2011

A moderate increase in European import and export volumes is expected in 2011, according to the most recent edition of the Global Port Tracker Report published by Hackett Associates and the Bremen Institute of Shipping Economics and Logistics.

Ports surveyed in this report include the six major container reports in North Europe: le Havre, Antwerp, Zeebrugge, Rotterdam, Bremen/Bremerhaven, and Hamburg.
For 2011, the report is calling for imports to be up 8.6 percent to hit slightly more than 23 million TEU and exports are expected to grow slightly less than 7 percent to 16.63 million TEU. 

In its previous edition, Hackett and Bremen said that 2010 in its entirety is forecasted at 15.23 million incoming TEU and 15.72 outgoing TEU for 12.9 and 11.2 percent gains, respectively, over 2009. Total 2010 volume remains very close to previous projections of 37.38 million TEU, which is 12.5 percent higher than 2009’s 33.22 million TEU.

For December, the most recent month for which data is available, the report noted that total container volumes for all surveyed ports were estimated to have decreased by 2.2 percent—or 66,000 TEU (Twenty-foot Equivalent Units)—to 3.00 million TEU from November and were up 4.2 percent compared to December 2009.

The Port Tracker report added that December imports were up about 2.7 percent from November and exports were down about 3.5 percent from November. Imports and exports were up 3.4 percent and 2.1 percent, respectively, from December 2009, with incoming volumes at 1.2 million TEU and outgoing volumes at 1.27 million TEU and the remaining 0.53 million representing empties.

Ben Hackett, president of Hackett Associates, said in an interview that January and February were likely to be down in terms of volume, due in part to the Chinese New Year, before picking up in March, adding that the first quarter should end up being stronger than the third or fourth quarters.

Even with increases expected, Hackett cautioned that austerity packages in place throughout European countries need to be monitored when it comes to assessing future growth, coupled with economic weakness for some southern European Union members and rising inflation.

When asked about capacity, Hackett said that there is more than enough capacity to handle European imports and exports, following a 2010 which saw carriers removing capacity in the third quarter of 2010 and then bringing it back in the fourth quarter, with some carriers again pulling capacity as volumes declined towards the end of 2010, which caused freight rates to drop as carriers tried to hold onto market share.

“There is more than enough capacity at the moment, as nobody has removed much the fourth quarter,” said Hackett. “Excess capacity has been driving freight rates down a bit, too. There are no container or capacity shortages at this point.”

For more articles on ocean shipping, please click here.

About the Author

Jeff Berman headshot
Jeff Berman
Group News Editor

Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

A recent report published by The Boston Consulting Group (BCG) and the Grocery Manufacturers Association makes clear the supply chain challenges consumer packaged goods (CPG) shippers are up against, with some of these challenges, specifically transportation-related ones, gaining traction in recent years.

Join Evan Armstrong, president of Armstrong & Associates, as he explains how creating a balanced portfolio of "Top 50" global and domestic partners can maximize efficiency and mitigate risk. Using the precise metrics captured in Armstrong’s most recent study, he'll demonstrate how shippers can measure ROI and plan for the future.

At $2.832 per gallon, the average price per gallon was down 1.1 cents, following drops of 1.6 and 1.1 cents the previous two weeks and a cumulative 8.2 cent cumulative drop over the last six weeks.

The index ISM uses to measure non-manufacturing growth—known as the NMI—was 56.0 in June, which edged out May by 0.3 percent.

Regardless of the date or year, one thing is beyond consistent when it comes to key themes in freight transportation logistics: the state of United States highways and related transportation infrastructure is in an eternal state of chaos and disrepair.

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2015 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA