Hurricane Isaac sweeps through Gulf

The Port of New Orleans Administration Building is not expected to reopen until Thursday, said port president and CEO, Gary LaGrange

By ·

As the full force of Hurricane Isaac has yet to be measured, the Port of New Orleans was taking no chances.

Port spokesmen told LM that they anticipated a “hurricane alert” to be imposed today, and all cargo operations have been shut down. The National Hurricane Center added that it expects heavy rains to complicate cargo operations for the next several days.

The Port of New Orleans Administration Building is not expected to reopen until Thursday, said port president and CEO, Gary LaGrange.

“The safety of our personnel and their families is paramount during any threat of this kind,” he said “Our staff and terminal operators have taken all of the necessary precautions in anticipation of the worst, while we hope for the best.”

LaGrange invoked a soupçon of certainty in this statement by adding “This isn’t our first rodeo.”

The ports of Pascagoula, Gulfport, Pascagoula and Mobile are also shut down until the storm passes, and Mississippi River pilots have anchored all vessels.

Today is the seventh anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, the devastating storm that destroyed much of New Orleans, but spared the port.

Indeed, port operations were soon ramped up shortly after that tragic episode to play a key role in rescue and emergency response.


About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at [email protected]

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