Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!


ISM non-manufacturing index falls but is still in growth mode

By Jeff Berman, Group News Editor
May 03, 2013

The Institute for Supply Management (ISM) reported today that while showing a bit of a decline overall, non-manufacturing activity in April remained in growth mode.

The ISM’s monthly Non-Manufacturing Report on Business stated that the index used by the ISM to measure non-manufacturing growth—known as the NMI—was 53.1 in April, falling 1.3 percent from March. Despite the decline, though, non-manufacturing activity increased for the 40th consecutive month.

A reading above 50 represents growth. Earlier this week, the ISM reported that the PMI, the index on which the ISM’s Manufacturing Report on Business is based on, fell 0.6 percent to 50.7 in April. This is below the 12-month average of 54.4.

The report’s four key metrics were all down in April. Business Activity/Production was down 1.5 percent at 55.0, and New Orders were down 0.1 percent at 54.5, and Employment dropped 1.3 percent at 52.0. As was the case in March, even with these declines, each metric remained firmly in growth territory.

“We have seen a little bit of slowing in the NMI growth rate, but each index is above contraction,” said Tony Nieves, chair of the ISM’s Non-Manufacturing Business Survey Committee, in an interview. “It is better to see them in the mid-50s range than the low 50s range.”

Regarding Employment, Nieves said the index was at 57.5 percent in January, which he attributed to early in the year confidence regarding the economy, acknowledging it would likely be hard to maintain that pace, due to slowing in the economy, coupled with uncertainty and concern as well about the economy.

Comments from ISM respondents were mixed when it comes to the state of the non-manufacturing economy. A Transportation and Warehousing respondent noted that business appears to be on an upswing, whereas a respondent from Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing, and Hunting said that demand is similar to 2012 as it is well-controlled by suppliers with overall demand trending to become weak.

April Inventories saw a 4.5 percent gain to 56.0, while Prices fell 4.7 percent to 51.2. Backlog of Orders was down 3.0 percent to 51.5.

“Because Prices are where they are, there might be a little bit of forward buying in there, coupled with a strong January and February to begin the year,” said Nieves. “Companies were gearing up their inventories, because there is cycle time involved with that, and then we have to look at turnover rates and other things. With the increase in inventory levels, that definitely slows the rate in Backlog of Orders growth and definitely impacted Supplier Deliveries [down 2.0 percent to 51.0 in April] because you can pull from existing stock or whatever is being classified as inventory so the rate in deliveries is slowing down.”

About the Author

Jeff Berman headshot
Jeff Berman
Group News Editor

Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

When it comes to the chances of the December 31, 2015 Positive Train Control (PTC) deadline being extended, something which railroads say is badly needed, it appears they need to be prepared to be disappointed. That was the chief takeaway of a statement from Sarah Feinberg, acting administrator of the United States Department of Transportation’s Federal Railroad Administration (FRA).

It’s said that innovation will lead the economy out of its current funk. But how does an organization become a perpetually innovative company? That’s one of the questions Kai Engel and his co-authors at A.T. Kearney set out to answer in their new book Masters Of Innovation.

At $2.843, the average price per gallon was down 1.6 cents, following last week’s 1.1 cent drop and a cumulative 7.1 cent cumulative drop over the last five weeks.

LM Group News Editor Jeff Berman caught up with UPS Freight President Jack Holmes at the National Shippers Strategic Transportation Council’s (NASSTRAC) Annual Conference and Exhibition. Berman and Holmes spoke about various aspects of the less-than-truckload sector (LTL), as well as related freight transportation news and trends.

In the third-party logistics (3PL) sector, the ongoing trend of merger and acquisition (M&A) activity never seems to take a break. That is apparent in recent weeks alone, with XPO Logistics recent acquisition of Norbert Dentressangle for $3.53 billion, Echo Global Logistics scooping up Command Transportation for $420 million, and Kuehne+Nagel buying ReTrans for an undisclosed sum.

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2015 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA