Jervis B. Webb executive earns U.S. patent for synchronized AGV system

Patent involves continuous, synchronized travel that allows AGVs to be used in assembly operations to replace traditional conveyor systems.

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Jervis B. Webb Company, a subsidiary of Daifuku Webb Holding Company and a leading provider of innovative material handling solutions, has announced that vice president of software and control engineering Christopher Murphy has earned a U.S. patent as sole inventor of an automated guided vehicle (AGV) system that allows for synchronized travel.

In the patented synchronized system, AGVs travel at an equal distance continuously along a line or path. This continuous motion allows AGVs to be used in assembly operations, replacing traditional conveyor systems. AGVs offer increased flexibility because the path can be quickly installed and modified to meet changing production needs. AGV systems are also scalable allowing capacity to be easily increased or decreased by adding or removing vehicles.

“We are fortunate to have Chris among our team of software and control engineers. His innovative spirit of developing new systems helps us better&rve our customers,” said Brian Stewart, chairman, president and CEO of Daifuku Webb Holding Company. “We encourage and celebrate our colleagues’ contributions, which ultimately keep us ahead in the material handling industry.”

Webb provides AGV installations for manufacturing plants and warehouses around the world.  AGVs provide optimal flexibility and are ideal for moving materials around an assembly plant or transporting goods throughout a plant or warehouse.


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