Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!



Keep an Eye on Charleston

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
August 16, 2010

The South Carolina State Ports Authority (SCSPA) and the South Carolina Coastal Conservation League (CCL) have successfully concluded several months of mediation and reached a settlement, ending a years-long battle and allowing Charleston’s new container terminal and port access road to proceed.

The port’s director of planning, Byron D. Miller, told LM in an interview that this represents a “second generation” of distribution services.

“Given our logistical reach to so many core regional industries, this is a significant step forward,” he said. Miller also noted that this is the first new terminal to be built on the U.S. East Coast.

The settlement agreement includes a number of commitments from both parties, setting a course for port expansion that continues in the most environmentally responsible manner.
Included in the agreement are specific actions to monitor and reduce air emissions from existing operations, as well as a commitment to accommodate and participate in a regional rail solution in the Charleston area. The port is also committing to reduce emissions by launching a voluntary truck replacement program to replace 85 percent of pre-1994 trucks calling on the port terminals by January 1, 2014.

The agreement resolves the CCL’s substantive challenges against the state and federal agencies’ permits for the new terminal and port access road. The new terminal project is the SCSPA’s top strategic priority, allowing it to handle long-term growth and attract new jobs and investment.

The CCL and the SCSPA agree that this settlement is a fair and reasonable resolution of the claims asserted by the CCL, and that the agreement is no admission of fault, wrongdoing, or liability. The actions in the agreement are being undertaken voluntarily by the SCSPA to address any and all claims.

According to ports spokesmen, the parties believe that this agreement and the forward-looking measures it contains “are in the best interest of the citizens, the economy, and the environment of South Carolina.”

About the Author

image
Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Last year at this time, retailers were relieved to learn that a tentative agreement on a new labor contract had been reached by dockside labor and management on the U.S. East and Gulf coasts. But not without considerable blood on the floor.

The National Retail Federation is encouraging maritime management and the union representing dockworkers along the U.S. West Coast ports to expedite pending contract negotiations and reach agreement on a new deal well in advance of the expiration of the current contract this summer.

SAP AG announced the availability of a new application to help centralize processing trade activities, SAP Global Trade Services, processing trade in China. 



Did you know that Supplier Portals can help companies reduce risk, improve compliance and enhance product availability? Download Amber Road's latest research report featuring research from Gartner.

Problem: In the margin-challenged consumer goods industry, your supply chain is under constant pressure to cut costs and maintain customer service and visibility. Solution: By breaking through silos and viewing the supply chain holistically, companies like yours are reducing supply chain costs by an average of 10% to 20%.

Article Topics

Blogs · Truck · Railroad · Container · Distribution · All topics

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2013 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA