Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!


Leveraging Trade Agreements to Achieve the Next Level of Savings from Global Sourcing


February 07, 2012

Manufacturers can spend 50% or more of revenue on purchasing parts. So, it is not surprising that sourcing from low cost countries to improve competitiveness has been such an important business strategy in the past ten years. According to AberdeenGroup 60 percent of manufacturers have turned to China as the cornerstone of their low-cost sourcing strategies and in the past few years this level of spend has almost doubled — from 21 percent to 39 percent. The ability to outsource product and skilled trade labor, at a fraction of the cost is integral in maintaining a competitive advantage in market pricing.

To achieve the next level of savings from a low-cost country sourcing strategy, leading companies are using trade agreements to reduce landed costs through duty reduction.

Free trade agreements are a pact or program between a designated group of countries that have agreed to eliminate tariffs, quotas and preferences on most (if not all) goods and services traded between them. Free trade agreements are designed to promote trade between regions, increase labor and sourcing opportunities within those regions, and open up foreign markets to exporters. Free trade agreements (FTAs) pose an incredible opportunity for global companies to reduce landed cost of sourced product, and improve profit margins on exported product from anywhere between 3-7% on average.


Download this paper:
Leveraging Trade Agreements to Achieve the Next Level of Savings from Global Sourcing
Sponsored by:
image
* Indicates a required field
*Email:
*First Name:
*Last Name:
*Title:
*Company:
*Country:
*Address 1:
Address 2:
*City:
*State:
Province/Region:
*Zip/Postal Code:
*Phone Number:
Save my data on this computer (do not use on public/shared computers)

Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

As was the case for the second quarter, third quarter earnings results for publicly-traded less-than-truckload (LTL) carriers are again strong. Signs of solid earnings results from carriers that have posted earnings to date include tonnage increases, gains in weight per shipment and average daily shipments, higher yield, and revenue per hundredweight.

While the holiday season is known to bring good tidings and cheer to all, it may also come with another thing that is not so pleasant: higher rate freights. That was the thesis of a commentary written by Mark Montague, industry pricing analyst and chief market-watcher for DAT, a Portland, Ore.-based subsidiary of TransCore.

Earlier this week, FedEx said it is expanding its International First service for early deliveries with the addition of 31 new origin countries, which will bring the total number of origin markets for the service to 97.

Monday, December 22 is pegged as UPS's peak delivery day, as the company expects to deliver more than 34 million packages that day, adding that it expects to see six days in December top last year’s peak shipment day delivery record of 31 million packages.

The time has come again for less-than-truckload (LTL) general rate increases (GRI), with various carriers recently announced their respective rate hikes in recent days.

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2013 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA