Linking Supply Chain Transformation to the Profit and Loss Statement

This document is intended for use as a decision framework for supply chain transformations that yield positive net contribution to the company's bottom line.

By · November 4, 2013

Aberdeen Group’s Chief Supply Chain Officer (CSCO) Survey (January 2011) collected data from 191 companies of which 56 claim to have active C-level support for supply chain process/technology investments. Findings from that survey were shared at Aberdeen’s Supply Chain summit (March, 2011) and indicate that globalization is driving change and transformation across virtually every process step of the inbound-to-outbound supply chain for companies of all sizes and industry segments.

This Analyst Insight will explore how the 56 companies with active C-level involvement are approaching the global expansion of their supply chains relative to their peers. It will examine the improvement areas addressed by these C-level Supply Chain Executives.

This examination will trace 21key inbound-to-outbound process steps through a process hierarchy and link these actions to the benefits they yield to the company profit and loss statement, balance sheet and cash flow statement. This document demonstrates the types of capabilities that companies are leveraging and highlights case studies and business results.


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Article Topics

Amber Road · Global Trade · All Topics
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