Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!

Logistics Managers may be in short supply before long

Experts said the brand perception of the industry needs re-invigorating and it is also seen as one of the most poorly paid and least diverse to work in
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
March 31, 2012

A new report has warned the global transportation and logistics industry (T&L) is in urgent need of a radical transformation by 2030 if it is to stay competitive.

In Winning the Talent Race, Volume 5 of PwC’s Transportation & Logistics 2030 series, experts said the brand perception of the industry needs re-invigorating and it is also seen as one of the most poorly paid and least diverse to work in.

PwC created 15 theses which were presented to a panel of 94 senior executives from 24 countries working in business, government and the scientific arena. Over the course of eight weeks they studied the hypothesis and were asked to assess the probability of each one on a scale of 0-100 percent.

“These findings are hugely significant for the T&L sector showing us what must be done before the industry falls into a critical state,” said PwC’s global T&L leader, Klaus-Dieter Ruske.

Poor image, poor pay and poor prospects are all perceptions that currently choke the industry. The reality is that there are rewarding, multinational opportunities out there that need tapping into.”

Panelists also predicted pay would continue to be low in the majority of jobs in comparison to other industries. In the UK for example, the average salary of someone in finance could be £51,620 but in T&L it’s £28,022 – 46 percent less. In the U.S., a worker in the electricity/energy sector could earn $65,150 on average, but in T&L this would drop to $43,400.

Klaus-Dieter Ruske came to some of the same conclusions drawn by scholars and executive recruiters participating in our annual Salary Survey:

“T&L companies need to take a critical view of their remuneration systems,” he said. “They should benchmark their salaries against their peers and other industries and recognize salary alone isn’t the only way to compensate employees.”

About the Author

Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Seasonally-adjusted (SA) for-hire truck tonnage in October at 135.7 (2000=100) was up 1.9 percent compared to September’s 133.1, and the ATA’s not seasonally-adjusted (NSA) index, which represents the change in tonnage actually hauled by fleets before any seasonal adjustment was 139.8 in October, which was 0.9 percent ahead of September.

The average price per gallon of diesel gasoline fell 3.7 cents to $2.445 per gallon, according to data issued today by the Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration (EIA). This marks the lowest weekly price for diesel since June 1, 2009, when it was at $2.352 per gallon.

In its report, entitled “Grey is the new Black,” JLL takes a close look at supply chain-related trends that can influence retailers’ approaches to Black Friday.

This year, it's all about the digital supply network. In this virtual conference, we will define the challenges currently facing supply chain organizations and offer solutions designed to transform linear operations into dynamic, automated networks that offer seamless communication, visibility, and the ability to respond and optimize processes at any given time.

In his opening comments assessing the economy at last week’s RailTrends conference hosted by Progressive Railroading magazine and independent railroad analyst Tony Hatch, FTR Senior analyst Larry Gross said the economy continues to slog ahead at a relatively tepid pace, coupled with some volatility in terms of overall GDP growth. And amid that slogging, Gross said there is currently an economic hand-off occurring between the industrial sector and the consumer sector.

Article Topics

News · Global · Management · Logistics · All topics


Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.

© Copyright 2015 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA