Made in America, but expensive to ship

For U.S. exporters, reductions in oceanborne cargo service frequency due to slow steaming are problematic

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For U.S. exporters, reductions in oceanborne cargo service frequency due to slow steaming are problematic, says the National Industrial Transportation League.

As noted in our current news section, importers weighed in on a query from the Federal Maritime Commission on the effect of slow steaming on U.S. ocean liner commerce. Not surprisingly, most did not see any cost savings. In fact, there appear to be several disadvantages to the strategy.

For exporters the situation seems even worse. They are finding it harder to compete against foreign companies that are not affected due to their reliance on surface transportation rather than water.

Simply put, the lengthening of voyage time provides international companies with a competitive advantage because they can deliver products more quickly.

With exports placed high on the national agenda, is this really the best way to create jobs in America?

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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at [email protected]

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