Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!



Made in America, but expensive to ship

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
April 27, 2011

For U.S. exporters, reductions in oceanborne cargo service frequency due to slow steaming are problematic, says the National Industrial Transportation League.

As noted in our current news section, importers weighed in on a query from the Federal Maritime Commission on the effect of slow steaming on U.S. ocean liner commerce. Not surprisingly, most did not see any cost savings. In fact, there appear to be several disadvantages to the strategy.

For exporters the situation seems even worse. They are finding it harder to compete against foreign companies that are not affected due to their reliance on surface transportation rather than water.

Simply put, the lengthening of voyage time provides international companies with a competitive advantage because they can deliver products more quickly.

With exports placed high on the national agenda, is this really the best way to create jobs in America?

For related articles click here.

About the Author

image
Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

DHL has released the third edition of its Global Connectedness Index (GCI), a detailed analysis of the state of globalization around the world.

The truck driver shortage is worsening, threatening the trucking industry’s ability to serve the nation’s supply chains. The shortage will almost certainly cause fleets’ costs to increase and shippers’ rate to continue to rise.

The Agriculture Transportation Coalition has asked the Administration to bring in a federal mediator to help resolve the negotiations, and if a strike or lockout occurs, the AgTC advocates the rarely-invoked Taft-Hartley Act.

While U.S. manufacturers and retailers have been bemoaning the ongoing labor/management crisis at West Coast ports, the situation is becoming increasingly dire for U.S. agriculture and forest products exporters.

Express delivery and logistics services provider DHL recently announced it has rebranded the name of its DHL Global Mail group to DHL eCommerce as part of a move geared towards providing customers with new services and solutions for new markets as e-commerce continues its rapid expansion within supply chain and logistics.

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2013 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA