Mobile & Wireless: 60 seconds with David Krebs

Modern spends 60 seconds talking with David Krebs at VDC Research.

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Global transportation isn’t getting any easier to manage. With new rules and regulations to learn, new compliance requirements to adhere to, and new customers and business partners to onboard, navigating the complexities of the global market can be difficult for any company. To fully leverage their global supply chains, firms need a robust, global transportation management system that helps them navigate this ever-changing environment.
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David Krebs, VDC Research
Title: Vice president of mobile & wireless division
Location: Natick, Mass.
Experience: 12 years at VDC
Primary Focus: Enterprise and government mobility

Modern: We’ve heard a lot about mobility over the last year, especially in the consumer world, thanks to tablets, smart phones and solutions like mobile banking. What does mobility mean in the supply chain world?
Krebs: Fundamentally, I don’t think mobility in the supply chain has changed. It’s still the right information at the right point to support the right decision. For years, we’ve talked about mobile computing as a critical access and entry mechanism to the data that supports business processes. That remains unchanged. Mobility is about freedom. It’s about fluidity. And it’s about untethering people from workstations. It’s not yet about your latest and greatest smart phone on the shop floor because those devices can’t support the rigors of an industrial environment. We still see purpose-built devices to support workflows on the shop floor.

Modern: Is mobility growing and, if so, what’s driving the growth?
Krebs: Yes, it’s growing. There is an acute focus on mobility, and I think in part that’s a result of consumer stories, like Apple-inspired smart phone and tablet technologies. The growth is also a reflection of the fact that mobile technology has played a role in enabling the real-time business. We want to make a decision wherever we might be, whether that’s at work, in an airport or at the beach. I think the big realization is that mobile computing can free us to spend more time on the areas where we should be spending more time, like being in front of customers or managing assets instead of doing the more mundane things like looking for assets. The other change is that mobility was once viewed as a point solution, such as picking in the warehouse. Now, organizations are looking at mobility more strategically. They are looking at all of their workflows and asking whether mobility can address operational pain points and efficiencies.

Modern: Is business adopting smart phones and tablets on the floor or in logistics?
Krebs: In the warehouse and on the shop floor, ruggedized tablets may have a role to play, but it will be as a mounted solution and not a handheld solution. Where these devices are seeing an uptake is in very highly customer-centric situations. The interface and sleekness of the devices makes them appealing candidates for those applications. They’re not great for daylight visibility; they’re not great in a hot environment; and they’re not great in an industrial environment. Organizations are asking questions about them, but I think there are elements of a rugged mobile computer that you can’t replicate in a tablet or smart phone.


About the Author

Bob Trebilcock
Bob Trebilcock, editorial director, has covered materials handling, technology, logistics and supply chain topics for nearly 30 years. In addition to Supply Chain Management Review, he is also Executive Editor of Modern Materials Handling. A graduate of Bowling Green State University, Trebilcock lives in Keene, NH. He can be reached at 603-357-0484.

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Latest Whitepaper
Managing Global Transportation: How NVOCCs can operate more profitably
Global transportation isn’t getting any easier to manage. With new rules and regulations to learn, new compliance requirements to adhere to, and new customers and business partners to onboard, navigating the complexities of the global market can be difficult for any company. To fully leverage their global supply chains, firms need a robust, global transportation management system that helps them navigate this ever-changing environment.
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From the July 2016 Issue
While it’s currently a shippers market, the authors of this year’s report contend that we’ve entered a “period of transition” that will usher in a realignment of capacity, lower inventories, economic growth and “moderately higher” rates. It’s time to tighten the ties that bind.
2016 State of Logistics: Third-party logistics
2016 State of Logistics: Ocean freight
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