National Gateway kicks off operations for Northeast Ohio Terminal

National Gateway officials said that the Northeast Ohio Terminal is the cornerstone of a new double-stack freight rail corridor between East Coast sea ports such as the Port of Baltimore and the Midwest.

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Earlier this week, the National Gateway launched operations of its new Northeast Ohio Terminal.

The National Gateway is an $842 million public-private partnership (PPP) infrastructure initiative designed to provide a highly efficient freight transportation link between the Mid-Atlantic ports and the Midwest. It was first unveiled by Class I railroad carrier CSX Corporation in May 2008. CSX and its affiliates have contributed $395 million in funding contributions to this effort, with states—including Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia—expected to contribute $189 million and another $258 million requested from the federal government.

National Gateway officials said that the Northeast Ohio Terminal is the cornerstone of a new double-stack freight rail corridor between East Coast sea ports such as the Port of Baltimore and the Midwest, adding that it employs more than 200 full-time employees, and will serve as the transfer point for hundreds of thousands of freight containers annually.

They also explained that CSX will gradually transition customer shipments through the new terminal over the next few months. Once all of the transitions are complete, the Northwest Ohio facility is expected to handle a throughput capacity, including block swaps and lifts, of nearly 2 million containers per year. Blocks are multiple rail cars with a common destination, and lifts refer to container handling between rail cars and trucks.

When the entire National Gateway project is completed, CSX officials said it will provide greater capacity for product shipments in and out of the Midwest, reduce truck traffic on congested highways, as well as create thousands of jobs that will directly or indirectly support the National Gateway. The company explained that the National Gateway will be comprised of the following: the building or expansion of several high-capacity, job-producing intermodal terminals where product shipments are exchanged between trucks and trains; and CSX collaborating with state and federal government agencies to create double-stack clearances beneath public overpasses along the railroad, which allow each train to carry roughly twice as many cargo boxes.

The National Gateway will focus on three existing rail corridors that run through Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia: the I-70/I-76 Corridor between Washington, D.C. and northwest Ohio via Pittsburgh; the I-95 Corridor between North Carolina and Baltimore via Washington, D.C.; and the Carolina Corridor between Wilmington and Charlotte, North Carolina.

Officials at The National Gateway Council said that this project will “improve American competitiveness in global markets, create jobs, reduce transportation related emissions and alleviate congestion on roads and highways.” They added that every dollar spent on the National Gateway returns $6 of public benefits by increasing freight capacity and reducing transit times between East and West Coast ports and major population centers by 24-48 hours.

CSX executives have stated that this effort will highlight the effectiveness of intermodal transportation, in terms of economic and efficiency gain, noting that “intermodal transportation combines the efficiency of rail with the flexibility of trucks …and as our nation faces combined pressures from an increasingly globalized economy and deteriorating transportation infrastructure, it is critical that we work together to bolster this pillar of our national economy.”

And industry analysts have told LM that the National Gateway, continues the model to bring in a wide variety of constituents to support efforts to add infrastructure capacity, as well as highlight how intermodal cooperation is critical both now and in the future to boost freight movement in the National Gateway’s corridors.

For more articles on intermodal shipping, please click here.


About the Author

Jeff Berman, Group News Editor
Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. Contact Jeff Berman

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