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3PL news: New CEVA cross-docking facility provides shippers with more efficiencies

By Staff
May 19, 2011

Global third-party logistics (3PL) services provider CEVA is continuing to increase its presence in the United States. The company announced this week it has relocated its cross-dock operations to a new facility in Otay Mesa, California, which is less than three miles from its previous location.

CEVA has had a presence in Otay Mesa for more than two decades, according to company officials. And they added that the new facility, which is comprised of 28,000 square-feet and 14 dock doors, has been renovated in an effort to best serve shippers along the San Diego and Tijuana border.

The docking space in the new facility is 25 percent larger than the previous location and is designed to augment supply chain velocity and throughput by providing cargo visibility heading to multiple destinations.

“Our newly expanded facility will greatly enhance our cross dock operations,” said Dennis Cancino, Station Manager for CEVA’s California and Mexico cross border operations, in a statement.  “Not only will our customers benefit from our improvements but CEVA employees will also appreciate the new facility’s upgraded features and redesigned warehouse offices.”

A CEVA spokesperson told LM the biggest benefits of this new location include:
-more dock doors to service customer trucks and drivers;
-a decreased depth of its warehouse that reduced loading times; and
-improving throughput by minimizing travel, footsteps or material handling distance, and number of touches to freight.

In terms of how freight flows into and out of the new facility, the spokesperson explained that by increasing the facility’s docking space by 25 percent, they have easier and quicker access for material consolidation and pickup.

CEVA added that its warehouse staff receives raw materials from domestic and international suppliers and coordinates the consolidation and transportation to customer plants for manufacturing or assembly. And CEVA also receives finished goods from customers in Mexico at Otay Mesa, which are distributed domestically and internationally.

The facility also provides: full-service Warehouse Management System capabilities for customer visibility and inventory management; on-site customer service staff for transportation and compliance coordination; raw material and finished goods receipt; order fulfillment services; and warehouse storage.

Click here for more articles on CEVA.

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