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On-line supply chain and engineering to be offered by ASU

One of only a handful of programs of its kind, this degree is designed for working professionals who have a background in supply chain
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
March 04, 2013

Master of Science in Supply Chain Management and Engineering (MS-SCME) is now available online through the W. P. Carey School of Business Arizona State University (ASU).

The first semester begins in Fall, 2013, said Dr. John Fowler, chair of the Supply Chain Management Department at the W. P. Carey School of Business, which offers the transdisciplinary MS-SCME program.

“One of only a handful of programs of its kind, this degree is designed for working professionals who have a background in supply chain,” said Fowler. “Students gain in-depth knowledge across supply chain management functions and explore state-of-the-art engineering tools to analyze, control, and optimize modern supply chains. This offers the chance to use both business and industrial-engineering perspectives to solve problems faced by the increasingly complex supply chains of modern companies.”

MS-MSCE is delivered by the W. P. Carey School of Business Supply Chain Management Department and the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering’s Industrial Engineering Program.
In an interview with SCMR, Fowler said that some students are abandoning MBA programs because of their expense and time commitment.

The degree is meant for working professionals who want a deeper understanding of both supply chain management and industrial engineering,” he said. “We believe it’s ideal for mid-level working professionals with approximately five years of experience in the supply chain field.”

Fowler added that the degree is delivered online to meet the demands of busy working professionals, requiring only one campus visit for a comprehensive student orientation. Professor Amy Hillman is dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University.

“Supply chain operations are a rapidly growing sector of the U.S. economy, especially in the service area” said Fowler. “Companies such as American Express, Intel, and Raytheon rely heavily on continuously improving their supply chain strategy and operations for global success.”

About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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