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Oracle changes its tune on “The Cloud”

“The Oracle Public Cloud is a little different,” said Oracle CEO Larry Ellison.
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
October 10, 2011

Oracle, which up until recently been openly dismissive of “cloud computing,” made a major reversal last week when it embraced the new technology.

“The Oracle Public Cloud is a little different,” said Oracle CEO Larry Ellison. “The Oracle Public Cloud is both a platform as a service and applications as a service.  The key difference is the Oracle Public Cloud is based on industry standards and supports full interoperability with other clouds and your datacenter on premise.”

In his keynote presentation at Oracle Openworld in San Francisco last week, Ellison explained how The Oracle Public Cloud runs on Oracle engineered Systems, providing users and partners with “elastic,” and secure infrastructure for their critical business applications.

Industry analysts have noted that logistics and supply chains are among the richest of today’s data domains, with data doubling in less than every two years.

“The Oracle Public Cloud is the only public cloud that offers customers a complete range of business applications and technology solutions, avoiding the problems of data and business process fragmentation when customers use multiple siloed public clouds,” stated spokesmen at a subsequent press conference.

Pricing for the Oracle Public Cloud will be based on a monthly subscription model, and each service can be purchased independently of other services.
The Oracle Public Cloud provides many common services, including resource management and isolation, security, data exchange and integration, virus scanning, white list management, and centralized self-service monitoring.

The Oracle Public Cloud offers self-service, subscription-based access to Oracle Fusion Applications, Oracle Fusion Middleware and Oracle Database as a service, including the Oracle Social Network.
According to spokesmen, this an enterprise collaboration and social networking solution with a broad range of social tools designed to capture and share information among teams in the context of business processes and enterprise applications (such as CRM and HCM).

“Oracle Social Network enables natural conversations and jump-starts productivity with purposeful social networking without the noise of unrelated or random social conversations,” said spokesmen.

 

About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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