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Panama Canal preparations under full sail

The Panama Canal expansion - expected to be complete by 2014 - has seaports throughout the hemisphere readying for a new competitive landscape. For most, that means offering value-added services designed to move inbound goods faster than ever before. Here’s where the preparations currently stand.
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The Expansion of the Panama Canal (Third Set of Locks Project) is a project, proposed by the Panama Canal Authority (ACP), that will double the capacity of the Panama Canal by 2014 by allowing more and larger ships to transit.

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
February 24, 2011

When the American Association of Port Authorities (AAPA) held it’s fourth annual “Shifting International Trade Routes Seminar” in Tampa, Fla., more than a few speakers sounded the call for more infrastructure.

“As we look back on a difficult couple of years and ahead on how trade can spur economic recovery and future growth, we must begin developing and implementing policy and programs that will sustain and improve critical gateways for global trade,” says Kurt Nagle, AAPA president and CEO. “By raising the priority of seaports and their connecting infrastructure in the federal agenda, America can modernize its seaports and intermodal connections to help make the nation more internationally competitive in an increasingly fierce global trading environment.”

According to Nagle, this particular event will also focus on how trade patterns and infrastructure needs will be affected by the expansion of the Panama Canal that’s currently underway. Among those slated to speak at the AAPA event is Dick Steinke, executive director of the Port of Long Beach. And if he is to make a case for more spending in Southern California, Steinke has the support of Joel Anderson, president and CEO of the International Warehouse Logistics Association.

“Competition for international trade is changing as the global recession caused shippers and receivers to reevaluate their supply chains,” says Anderson. “For the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, this means restoring their reputation as freight friendly distribution points and mini-bridge centers.”

About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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