Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!


Panjiva data shows nice rebound from December to January

By Jeff Berman, Group News Editor
February 23, 2011

Data from Panjiva, an online search engine with detailed information on global suppliers and manufacturers, found that the number of United States-bound waterborne shipments increased 17 percent from December to January.

This represents a significant improvement from a 14 percent decline from November to December and a 2 percent decline from October to November. What’s more, the most recent batch of data halts a four-month stretch in which U.S.-bound waterborne shipments declined.

The actual number of shipments in January—1,015,854—was 15 percent better than December’s 868,365, and 12 percent better than the 910,596 shipments moved during January 2010.

And the number of global manufacturers shipping to the U.S. in January—142,036—was 6 percent better than December’s 134,864, while posting a 7 percent annual improvement over January 2010’s 133,729 global manufacturers. Panjiva said that this is the first time in the three years it has been collecting this data that there was an increase in the number of global manufacturers shipping to the U.S. from December to January.

“These numbers are certainly a pleasant surprise,” said Panjiva CEO Josh Green in an interview. “I think it suggests the December numbers really represented a blip, and that we are not at the leading edge of a significant downturn, which is great news.”

Aside from this data, Green said there are a number of encouraging signs that support the thesis of a slow-but-steady economic recovery, including the most recent Consumer Confidence Index from the Conference Board increasing to 70.4 in February from 64.8 in January and continued growth in the Institute for Supply Management’s Manufacturing Report on Business.

Even with some economic signs, Green noted that the rising price of oil has the potential to be a drag on the overall pace of the economic recovery, as well as wreak havoc on businesses that are moving goods like what happened throughout much of 2008 when oil barrel prices nearly hit $150.

But despite the potential drag of oil prices, there are across-the-board indications that the recovery is gaining steam, said Green.

Green noted that aside from December’s weak performance, November and January were close in terms of overall output with Panjiva’s data. And when looking at the data from August to February, it is looking at data moving from a seasonal high to a seasonal low.

“Holding steady is not such a bad thing,” said Green. “I would expect February, which is traditionally the lowest month of the year, to drop off from January, and I would not be alarmed by that at all. If history is any guide, we should see some growth from February going forward in the 3-to-5 percent range per month. Anything in that range is a typical global trade trajectory. It is a mixed bag and there are some challenges ahead, but we have the wind at our backs, which is nice.”

For more articles on Panjiva, please click here.

About the Author

Jeff Berman headshot
Jeff Berman
Group News Editor

Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Read how others are using Business Process Modeling to implement Microsoft Dynamics AX with reduced risk.

While diesel prices have largely been out of the spotlight in 2014, freight transportation and logistics stakeholders always need to keep a close eye on what prices are doing, as it has a significant impact on transportation budgets and forecasting.

Railroad service issues and rates, which many rail shippers deem as unreasonable, are front and center in a piece of legislation to be introduced soon by Senators Jay Rockefeller (D-WV) and John Thune (R-SD), chairman and ranking member of the Senate Committee on Commerce Science and Transportation.

The Nicaragua Canal will be three times the length of the Panama Canal, crossing the major Lago de Nicaragua, one of the largest freshwater reservoirs in the region.

FTR and Internet Truckstop said that this alliance will provide shippers and carriers with myriad benefits, including market analysis and specificity for contract and spot freight segments by region and trailer type.

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2013 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA