Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!

Panjiva data shows slight gains in U.S.-bound shipments

By Jeff Berman, Group News Editor
September 09, 2010

The number of global manufacturers shipping to the United States inched up from July to August, according to data from Panjiva, an online search engine with detailed information on global suppliers and manufacturers.

Following a 0.2 percent increase from June to July, July to August was stronger, with a 1 percent bump in U.S.-bound shipments (1,138,601 shipments), according to Panjiva. While there have been gains in the last two months, these tallies still trail the first half of the year, which saw a 9 percent spike from April to May and matching 3 percent gains for the previous two months.

On a year-over-year basis, August shipments were up 15 percent.

Panjiva also reported that there was a 4 percent increase in the number of U.S. companies receiving waterborne shipments from global manufacturers in August, following a 2 percent gain from June to July. This edges out a 3 percent annual gain from the same period last year and flat growth in 2008.

Panjiva CEO Josh Green told LM he was encouraged by the most recent numbers.

“There had been some speculation that we had already seen the peak of 2010 in July,” said Green. “And that appears not to have been the case. It suggests that when [shippers] placed their orders a couple months ago they were feeling relatively bullish about this year’s holiday season. There is some possibility, though, that companies were overly optimistic and over-ordered in which case they will be stuck with too much inventory. We have to hope that between now and the holiday season, consumer confidence shores up a bit so retailers are not disappointed.”

Whether or not that happens remains to be seen, given relatively low retail sales numbers and consumer confidence levels in recent months on the heels of a fairly strong first half of 2010. One encouraging sign was today’s Department of Commerce report regarding the trade deficit, which fell from a 2010 high $49.8 billion in June down to $42.8 billion in July, with the $196.1 billion in imports $4.2 billion less than June. And the Institute of Supply Management’s Manufacturing index has seen consistent growth for more than a year. More concerning data appears to be sluggish GDP growth and underwhelming durable goods orders.

Green said that it appears global trade is currently on a seasonal path despite the lack of robust, exciting economic growth. But that is not the say that 4 percent month-to-month gains in U.S. shipments will continue either.

“The typical track is the peak month in August and then beginning a slow decline through December and into the first quarter of next year for a slow, steady decline,” said Green. “Global trade is about as healthy as it can be with consumer confidence being where it is. We need to see consumer confidence improvements before we seen any significant growth in global trade activity.”

About the Author

Jeff Berman headshot
Jeff Berman
Group News Editor

Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Logistics managers have always been under pressure to strike the right distance between specialized intermediaries and the markets they want to serve. That challenge is becoming increasingly complex, however, as mega-brokerage enterprises capture more share.

There are so many ways to analyze the state of truckload capacity, and on top of that there is, perhaps, no other facet of freight transportation that is so directly impacted by myriad moving parts, whether it be driver availability, rates, demand, weather, the economy, and, of course, federal regulations, among others.

The ATA said that the annualized turnover rate for large truckload carriers, which it defines as truckload fleets with more than $30 million in revenue, increased 3 percent to an annualized rate of 87 percent in the second quarter.

If you want to meet some of the most ticked-off people on the planet, talk to any trucking industry retiree who received that letter from the Teamsters’ Central States pension plan notifying them of their potential financial haircut coming in retirement.

Global express delivery and logistics services provider DHL introduced a new flight geared towards Michigan-based importers and exporters out of the Detroit Metropolitan Airport.

Article Topics

News · Global Trade · Panjiva · Shipments · All topics


Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.

© Copyright 2015 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA