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Port of LA can ban non-union drivers, judge says

Shippers will be less than enthused
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
August 27, 2010

Yesterday’s federal court ruling that the Port of Los Angeles can regulate trucks that haul goods in and out of its property was cheered by local government leaders and organized labor.

Shippers will be less than enthused.

“While the concept of clean trucks in and of itself is not a bad notion, it reduced the number of trucks in Southern California at a time that demand outpaced supply,” noted shipping consultant, Jon Monroe.

In an interview with LM, he added that another big issue of concern will be how carriers and trucker address the new chassis policies.

“This will be the nightmare for 2011,” Monroe added.

U.S. District Court Judge Christina Snyder ruled that the port’s Clean Trucks Program can require big rigs entering the port to comply with strict diesel emissions standards and eliminate owner-operator drivers.

For Michael Berzon, chair of the National Industrial Transportation League’s ocean cargo committee, the point is moot:

“The Clean and Sustainable Transportation Coalition, which includes importers, exporters, transportation services providers and logistics industries, is concerned about the “camel’s nose under the tent” phenomenon which could negatively affect small businesses , owner operators that move a great deal of U.S. exports and imports,” he told LM.

About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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