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Port of LA posts big outbound numbers

Imports also increased 2.3 percent compared to the previous year.
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
January 17, 2012

For the second consecutive year, the Port of Los Angeles experienced record-breaking exports as outbound container volumes surged 14.5 percent in 2011 compared to 2010.

Imports also increased 2.3 percent compared to the previous year. Total annual volumes, including empty containers, rose 1.4 percent.

Zepol Corporation, a leading trade intelligence company reported late last week that U.S. import shipment volume for December, measured in twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs), decreased 8.2 percent from November.

Meanwhile the port is investing $1.5 billion in capital improvements over the next five years.

“2011 was our second straight year of record exports and it’s an example of how our Port is prepared to handle a shift in global trade patterns,” said Port Executive Director Geraldine Knatz, Ph.D. “We continue to facilitate export opportunities through our nationally-recognized TradeConnect Program while focusing our longer-term strategies on retaining and growing our position as the nation’s busiest container seaport.”

The Port handled a total of 7,940,511 in 2011 compared to 7,831,902 TEUs in 2010. Port exports rose 14.5 percent to 2,109,394 in 2011 compared to 1,841,273 in 2010. Total year-over-year imports increased 2.3 percent to 4,066,763 in 2011 versus 3,973,933 the prior year.

The port ended 2011 on a strong note, with December volumes showing gains in all categories. Exports increased 9.2 percent (176,530 TEUs) compared to the previous December (161,625,000 TEUs). Imports jumped 6.4 percent (318,355 TEUs) compared to December 2010 (299,304 TEUs). Total December volumes, including empties, increased 6 percent to 649,468 TEUs compared to December 2010’s 612,651 TEUs.

About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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