Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!


Port of Long Beach director to retire

Richard D. Steinke, executive director of the Port of Long Beach, will be retiring September 30th at the top of his game, however
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
April 06, 2011

When ocean shipping’s “peak season” comes to end next fall, one of the industry’s leading port directors will be stepping down.

Richard D. Steinke, executive director of the Port of Long Beach, will be retiring September 30th at the top of his game, however, having presided over a massive transformation of the port to make in one the country’s largest ocean cargo gateways.

“I have accomplished most of what I set out to do at the Port,” said Steinke in a statement. “I’m pleased that I can move on knowing that I leave the port a better place than when I came on board.”

But not without considerable struggle. As he noted in an address before the “Pulse of the Port” seminar late last month, some problems still remain to be solved.

“We are still working on matching productivity on trucking side with that on the longshore side,” he said. “Right now, it’s a mishmash.”

While Steinke implemented a pioneering “Green Port Policy” that included an extremely successful “Clean Trucks Program,” developed with the rival Port of Los Angeles, issues remain, particularly in regard to labor.

Unlike Los Angeles, the Port of Long Beach does not require drayage truckers to be union members. The ongoing battle between the Teamsters and owner-operators may be something Steinke’s successor inherits. Port spokesmen meanwhile, have not disclosed who that candidate might be.

Partnerships and collaboration have been hallmarks of Steinke’s leadership style, enabling him to steer the port through the complex process of winning approval for the $1 billion Middle Harbor Redevelopment Project, which will create one of the most efficient and greenest terminals in the world, and the $950 million Gerald Desmond Bridge Replacement Project, which will assure safe access in and out of the nation’s leading port complex. Steinke’s retirement comes as Long Beach is kicking off $4 billion in major improvements over the next decade to cement its position among the world’s elite ports.

For related stories click here.

About the Author

image
Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

February manufacturing data issued today by the Institute for Supply Management (ISM) dipped slightly compared to January, according to the most recent edition of the organization’s Manufacturing Report on Business.

As U.S. West Coast ports begin to address their critical congestion issues, an innovative approach is being launched at San Pedro Bay.

The ongoing financial travails of the Highway Trust Fund was made clear in a position paper recently issued by Jeff Davis, senior fellow at the Eno Center for Transportation. In the paper–entitled “Why Not A Ten-Year Surface Transportation Bill?”-Davis points to past federal transportation bills, as well as the White House’s GROW AMERICA proposal as having one fatal flaw in common: they each leave the HTF on worst financial shape after the bill expires than it was prior to the bill being enacted.

Working with research partner, The Economist Intelligence Unit, the IBM Institute for Business Value surveyed 1,023 global procurement executives from 41 countries in North America, Europe and Asia.

U.S. Carloads were down 7.8 percent annually at 259,544, and intermodal volume was off 15.7 percent for the week ending February 21 at 213,617 containers and trailers.

Article Topics

News · Ocean Freight · Ocean Cargo · World Trade · All topics

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2015 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA