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Port of Los Angeles makes significant improvements for drayage

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
January 27, 2014

In the coming weeks, the Port of Los Angeles will start construction on two major roadway projects that will improve the Harbor I-110 Freeway and nearby surface streets in San Pedro and Wilmington. The work, due to begin in February and extend through fall 2016, will make the Harbor Area safer and easier for cargo drayage vehicles to navigate.

Port spokesman, Phillip Sanfield told Logistics Management that these two road projects, representing more than $100 million in infrastructure investments, will help their “logistics chain partners” move their products faster, more efficiently and safer.

“We will continue to invest approximately $1.2 billion over the next five years in all aspects of our infrastructure so that we remain the premier trade gateway in North America,” he adds.

The Port is investing $46.6 million to widen the westbound transition from the SR-47 to the northbound I-110 and reconfigure the I-110/C Street interchange. The two projects will improve key segments of the freeway that link the nation’s No. 1 container port to downtown Los Angeles and are part of Southern California’s larger Regional Transportation Improvement Plan for a six-county area.

“These are significant public works projects that will improve the flow of traffic for thousands of commuters and truck drivers who use these roadways every day,” says Gary Lee Moore, Interim Executive Director of the Port of Los Angeles. “The I-110/C Street project will also help separate car and truck traffic near the port, making the drive safer and more manageable for everyone who lives and works in the harbor district.”

The Port’s contribution represents about half the $101 million cost of both projects. The Port is the lead agency working in partnership with two sister city agencies – the Department of Water and Power and the Department of Public Works Bureau of Engineering. The Port is also partnering with the California Department of Transportation and the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro).

About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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