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Port of San Francisco to enhance cargo operations

The current condition of the spur track limits the frequency, weight and length of trains that can use the track, causing delays.
By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
September 23, 2011

Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood has announced that the Port of San Francisco was awarded $2.97 million for rail improvements aimed at improving segments of its freight rail track in order to enhance safety, livability, and economic development.

“The rail improvements will provide Bay Area and regional shippers improved access to the port’s cargo terminals for moving their products,” said Jim Maloney, the port’s maritime marketing manager. “The local community will benefit from the jobs that will be created by the new business opportunities.”

In an interview with LM, Maloney said that The Quint Street Lead is a key link in the port’s rail infrastructure.

“The grant will facilitate the much-needed improvements,” he added.? 

The project will improve an approximately one mile-long spur connecting the Caltrain mainline track to the Port of San Francisco Rail Yard.  The current condition of the spur track limits the frequency, weight and length of trains that can use the track, causing delays. The improvements will allow freight trains to operate at higher speeds and clear the mainline more quickly, significantly reducing delays to Caltrain commuter trains and future high-speed rail trains.

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) received 51 applications from across the country for the Rail Line Relocation and Improvement (RLR) grants and the Port of San Francisco was one of only eight cities and ports to be awarded funding and had the top scoring project nationwide.

FRA’s Rail Line Relocation Grant Program assists projects that improve community livability and promote economic development by addressing the effects of rail traffic on safety, roadway and pedestrian traffic, overall quality of life and local area commerce.  Rail line relocation dollars announced last week will fund the Port of San Francisco project as well as projects in seven other states.

The port has two rail-served cargo terminals that will benefit from these improvements.  Pier 80 is San Francisco Bay’s only breakbulk cargo terminal and Pier 94/96 currently is a dry-bulk cargo terminal.

About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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Article Topics

News · Ocean Freight · Railroad · Ocean Cargo · All topics

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