Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!



Ports can be good “green” neighbors too

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
December 22, 2010

As noted in this column many times in the past, seaports are key to any sustainable economic recovery in this country.

The American Association of Port Authorities (AAPA) is right to point out that critical components of these “economic engines” are the diesel engines that power the ports’ cargo-handling equipment, drayage trucks and harbor craft, such as tugs, towboats and ferries. ?

Yet, diesel engines often contribute to reduced air quality, as older engines emit higher levels of particulate matter (PM) and oxides of nitrogen (NOX) than do newer technologies. As larger vessels enter U.S. waters bringing more cargo, ports must expand their landside operations to accommodate this growth, resulting in greater truck and rail traffic to and from the ports and increases in equipment used to load and unload cargo.

While increasing trade yields tremendous economic benefits, America’s public port agencies strive to both meet the nation’s commerce needs and be good stewards of the coastal environment, and have used DERA grants to reduce emissions in some of the country’s most densely populated areas.

About the Author

image
Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Many companies are turning to Global Trade Management (GTM) as a viable solution to address the complexities associated with international trade. But how do you successfully build a business case for GTM software?

Various media outlets reported this week that UPS will pay $25 million to settle allegations that it filed false claims to the federal government over guarantees it made related to delivery of Next Day air overnight packages.

While the dust continues to settle at West Coast ports after a nine-month labor dispute that saw the two main parties involved–the Pacific Maritime Association (PMA) and the International Longshore & Warehouse Union–reach a tentative labor agreement on February 22, the PMA said yesterday that its members voted to ratify a new contract with the ILWU.

The United States House of Representatives yesterday passed legislation, entitled H.R. 2353, the Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2015, by a 387-35 margin that extends current law and authorizes surface transportation programs through the end of July.

As the supply chains of high-tech shippers continue to mature and innovate, coupled with rapid growth, it is not a huge surprise to see them further leverage current strategies and lay the groundwork for newer ones, when it comes to further expanding their manufacturing supply chain capabilities. That was a key theme in the fifth Annual UPS Change in the (Supply) Chain (CITC) survey that was rolled out today.

Article Topics

Blogs · Truck · Railroad · Trade · All topics

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2015 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA