Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!

Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach post decent May volumes

By Jeff Berman, Group News Editor
June 16, 2011

Despite the increasingly negative economic headwinds of late, May volumes at the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach mostly showed some decent signs of growth.

POLB imports, which are primarily comprised of consumer goods, hit 275,100 (Twenty-foot Equivalent Units) in May, which was up 4 percent annually. This was up from April’s 270,107 and March’s 191,211. POLB Exports, which are primarily comprised of raw materials, were down 6.1 percent at 130,161 and were below April’s 270,107 and March’s 131,761.

Total POLB shipments for May—at 536,681 TEU—were up 2.3 percent annually.

Art Wong, spokesman for the Port of Long Beach, told LM in an interview that May numbers at the port were good but not great.”

“Compared to a year ago, export numbers are down but are in the same range we have seen in the last few months,” he said. “Given what is happening in the economy right now, these are good solid numbers.

When asked about the 6.1 percent annual drop in May exports, Wong explained that its comparison month in 2010 saw a significant spike in exports due to a major inventory re-build occurring at that time, making it tough for May 2011 to match that output.

POLA imports—at 360,969 TEU—were up 5.49 percent annually and ahead of April’s 312,359 TEU and March’s 297,023 TEU. Exports—at 184,274—were up 14.73 percent, ahead of April’s 167,448 TEU and behind March’s 192,849.

“We are really pleased with our May numbers,” said POLA Director of Communications Philip Sanfield. “Total shipments were up only 0.51 percent annually, but that is because empties were down so much [at 147,689 for a 20.86 percent annual decline]. May was our second best export month of the year behind March at 192,849, and the value of the American dollar had something to do with that.”

He added that POLA was up against challenging numbers from May 2010, which was up 20 percent over May 2009.

While May was solid at the port, he said the port is coming up against a very challenging next four months, given that volumes peaked early in 2010 and also did at other west coast ports.

“June, July and August were our best months in 2010,” he said. “We are not expecting growth beyond the numbers we had last June. If we do, we will be very pleased. We are estimating things will be relatively flat over the next six months or so regarding annual growth.”

About the Author

Jeff Berman headshot
Jeff Berman
Group News Editor

Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Seasonally-adjusted (SA) for-hire truck tonnage in October at 135.7 (2000=100) was up 1.9 percent compared to September’s 133.1, and the ATA’s not seasonally-adjusted (NSA) index, which represents the change in tonnage actually hauled by fleets before any seasonal adjustment was 139.8 in October, which was 0.9 percent ahead of September.

The average price per gallon of diesel gasoline fell 3.7 cents to $2.445 per gallon, according to data issued today by the Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration (EIA). This marks the lowest weekly price for diesel since June 1, 2009, when it was at $2.352 per gallon.

In its report, entitled “Grey is the new Black,” JLL takes a close look at supply chain-related trends that can influence retailers’ approaches to Black Friday.

This year, it's all about the digital supply network. In this virtual conference, we will define the challenges currently facing supply chain organizations and offer solutions designed to transform linear operations into dynamic, automated networks that offer seamless communication, visibility, and the ability to respond and optimize processes at any given time.

In his opening comments assessing the economy at last week’s RailTrends conference hosted by Progressive Railroading magazine and independent railroad analyst Tony Hatch, FTR Senior analyst Larry Gross said the economy continues to slog ahead at a relatively tepid pace, coupled with some volatility in terms of overall GDP growth. And amid that slogging, Gross said there is currently an economic hand-off occurring between the industrial sector and the consumer sector.


Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.

© Copyright 2015 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA