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SaaS Isn’t For Everyone: When Purchase-and-Install Makes Sense

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When Software-As-A-Service TMS isn’t the right choice—the merits of purchase-installed solutions. Transite, which sells both forms of TMS, has issued a six-page whitepaper outlining and detailing the top five reasons why buyers should consider purchase and install solutions.

  • The Flexibility to Control Your Destiny

  • You Control Your Data

  • Tighter Integration Model

  • Cost

  • Better Customer Experience




February 18, 2011

First, let’s acknowledge that Transite offers its transportation management solutions as software-as-a-service as well as a purchased, on-premise customer installation. So, the company isn’t trying to push readers away from SaaS—in fact, more than half of Transite’s customers utilize the company’s SaaS solution.

In today’s transportation management systems (TMS) market, companies continue to invest in transportation management software to reduce costs, improve efficiency, and help run their overall freight management functions more effectively.

Companies can either purchase and install their TMS solution or obtain the functionality through the software as a service model—and, if they are a shipper, they can simply choose to outsource the whole thing to a third-party logistics provider.



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