Sequester-related CBP cuts are on hold, says report

According to a Washington Post report, “CBP has postponed the elimination of furloughs to its employees and the elimination of overtime,” which came as a result of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013, which was signed into law last week.

By ·

When the federal budget sequestration cuts were recently rolled out, there were various components of it which stood to have a significant negative impact on U.S. Customs and Border Protection on multiple fronts, including requiring all CBP employees to be furloughed up to 14 days during the remainder of fiscal year 2013 or one day per pay period from early-to-mid April through September 30 and a subsequent ten percent pay cut.

Department of Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said before the Senate Appropriations Committee in March that “sequestration would have significant negative impacts on our economy, including travel, tourism, and trade” and:
-reductions mandated under sequestration would require furloughs and reduced staffing at U.S. points of entry and airports security checkpoints, increasing wait times for travelers and slowing commerce across the country;
-reduced CBP staffing would make four to five hour wait times commonplace and cause the busiest ports to face gridlock situations at peak periods and lead to long delays in U.S. commercial lanes as cargo waits to enter U.S. Commerce; and
-reduce inspectional overtime at CBP by $37.5 million and also result in longer wait times at points of entry

But these dire circumstances may not fully come to fruition, according to a report in the Washington Post.

According to the report, “CBP has postponed the elimination of furloughs to its employees and the elimination of overtime,” which came as a result of the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013, which was signed into law last week.

The report cited an agency memo sent to CBP employees that would allow CBP to mitigate to some degree the impacts of the reduced budget on operations and on CBP’s workforce.

And it cited CBP Deputy Commissioner as saying that ““in light of the new funding bill, we are re-evaluating previously planned furloughs and de-authorization of Administratively Uncontrollable Overtime (AUO), and will postpone implementation of both changes pending that re-examination.”

When the potential changes in CBP operations due to sequestration were initially issued, it was not entirely surprising, according to Albert Saphir, principal of ABS Consulting, in Bradenton, Florida.

“It was not a surprise to me, with most at CBP, TSA etc. having to take off 4 hours of every 40 hours worked,” he said.  “No overtime and no new hiring [could] put a squeeze on resources and we all will need to wait longer for many things that we have accustomed to being taken care of faster.  The same goes on the passenger side, delays at major airports of foreign arrival at CBP/Immigration and also at TSA screening lines.  We just have become accustomed to so many ‘benefits’ that maybe now both the trade and the private traveler will notice and maybe this will help lay groundwork for appropriate changes.”

About the Author

Jeff Berman, Group News Editor
Jeff Berman is Group News Editor for Logistics Management, Modern Materials Handling, and Supply Chain Management Review. Jeff works and lives in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, where he covers all aspects of the supply chain, logistics, freight transportation, and materials handling sectors on a daily basis. Contact Jeff Berman

Subscribe to Logistics Management Magazine!

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Article Topics

Customs & Regulations · All Topics
Latest Whitepaper
Case Study: LEAN Yields Big Results
Every day, companies across a wide range of industries use LEAN in their supply chains, warehouses and distribution centers, finance departments, and customer service centers, among other areas. LEAN practices improve safety, quality, and productivity by extracting cost and waste from all facets of an operation – from the procurement of raw materials to the shipment of finished goods.
Download Today!
From the October 2016 Issue
Over the past decade we’ve seen a major trend in regards to safety regulations for freight transport within the United States as well as for import and export shippers—that trend is the “international­ization” of rules and regulations.
European Logistics Update: Post-Brexit U.K. moving ahead, but in which direction?
Badcock Home Furniture &more: Out with paper, in with Cloud TMS
View More From this Issue
Subscribe to Our Email Newsletter
Sign up today to receive our FREE, weekly email newsletter!
Latest Webcast
How API Technology Connects the Transportation Economy
Dynamic decision making is made possible through accurate, actionable data. When combined with progress in data science and the Internet of Things, technology companies that add value to direct-to-carrier APIs and combine them with high-power data analytics will create new concepts for the information economy.
Register Today!
Motor Carrier Regulations Update: Caught in a Trap
The fed is hitting truckers with a barrage of costly regulations in an era of scant profits....
25th Annual Masters of Logistics
Indecision revolving around three complex supply chain elements—transportation, technology and...

2016 Quest for Quality: Winners Take the Spotlight
Which carriers, third-party logistics providers and U.S. ports have crossed the service-excellence...
Regional ports concentrate on growth and connectivity
With the Panama Canal expansion complete, ocean cargo gateways in the Caribbean are investing to...