Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!



Shippers may now use muscle to avoid another “Occupy” event

By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
December 21, 2011

Shippers have told the Port of Oakland that it’s time to get tough with the “Occupy” movement, or they’ll be moving their cargo through other ocean cargo gateways next year. The port listened, but Oakland’s City Council failed to support its most vital economic resource.

According to published reports, global shippers comprising Target, Walgreens, J.C. Penney, and Crate and Barrel had told the Port Commission that if tougher measures are not taken to keep protesters from disrupting operations, they will take their business elsewhere.

The port’s executive director, Omar Benjamin, brought this concern to Oakland’s City Council, but a vote to consider such action was deliberately avoided. Now “Occupy” leaders are calling this a victory.

Benjamin’s letter to the Council noted that many other ports – including those with lower labor and environmental standards – compete with Oakland on the basis of price.

“Disruptions here makes it easier for them to take cargo and jobs from us,” he said.

About the Author

image
Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

UPS today announced diluted earnings per share of $1.32 for the third quarter 2014, a 13.8% improvement over the prior year period. Operating profit increased 8.3%, resulting from balanced growth across all three segments.

The Department of Transportation’s Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) reported this week that U.S. trade with its North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) partners Canada and Mexico increased 4.4 percent from August 2013 to August 2014 at $100.6 billion.

As expected, global trade dipped from August to September but still saw annual gains, according to data issued this week by Panjiva, an online search engine with detailed information on global suppliers and manufacturers.

Transportation and logistics merger and acquisition (M&A) activity in the third quarter saw annual gains, which were driven by smaller deals in the trucking logistics, shipping, and passenger air sectors, according to data issued in the Intersections report by PwC this week.

With the holidays rapidly approaching, it appears retailers are not quite done getting inventory set up and on the shelves in time for what is expected to be a fairly active shopping season. That much was evident based on recent data for September volumes issued by the Port of Los Angeles (POLA) and the Port of Long Beach (POLB).

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2013 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA