Subscribe to our free, weekly email newsletter!


Study: Purchasing, logistics and operations professionals acknowledge collaboration shortcomings

University of Tennessee’s Global Supply Chain Institute reports on successful strategies for supply chain integration.University of Tennessee’s Global Supply Chain Institute reports on successful strategies for supply chain integration.
By Josh Bond, Contributing Editor
June 17, 2014

A new study has found organizations that closely integrate supply chain functions, cultures, metrics and operations – especially ties between purchasing and logistics—deliver better business results.

These are among the results from a new study from the Global Supply Chain Institute (GSCI) at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, which reflects the views of more than 180 supply chain professionals.

In a recent interview, Mike Burnette, supply chain executive for GSCI, said advances in recent years and global progress in terms of business process integration were steady. However, in a key part of the study, a number of purchasing and logistics professionals acknowledged pitfalls resulting from their lack of collaboration, ranking performances below expectations in areas that required the two groups working together.

“This research suggests that some of the silos have stubbornly persisted,” said Burnette. “This is particularly true with regard to supply chain integration and especially the connection between purchasing and logistics functions. Some companies even still have separate budget lines for the two, which was surprising to me; I didn’t think anyone did that anymore.”

Click here to read the full story and more study highlights at the Modern Materials Handling website.

About the Author

Josh Bond
Contributing Editor

Josh Bond is a contributing editor to Modern. In addition to working on Modern’s annual Casebook and being a member of the Show Daily team, Josh covers lift trucks for the magazine.


Subscribe to Logistics Management magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Get timely insider information that you can use to better manage your
entire logistics operation.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

While the volume decline was steep, there was numerous reasons behind it, including terminal congestion, protracted contract negotiations between the Pacific Maritime Association and the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, and other supply chain-related issues, according to POLA officials.

Truckload rates for the month of January, which measures truckload linehaul rates paid during the month, saw a 7.9 percent annual hike, and intermodal rates dropped 0.3 percent compared to January 2014, which the report pointed out marks the first annual intermodal pricing decline since December 2013.

Largely leveraging the net positive impact of lower fuel prices, the Shippers Conditions Index (SCI) from freight transportation consultancy FTR made major strides in December, the most recent month for which data is available.

With the Pacific Maritime Association (PMA) and the International Longshore & Warehouse Union (ILWU) recently agreeing to a tentative agreement on a new five-year contract last weekend covering about 20,000 port employees at 29 West Coast ports following roughly nine months of stops and starts and acrimonious negotiations, the focus for all port and supply chain stakeholders is firmly on the future.

Ports of Los Angeles, Long Beach Plan to Cooperate on Environmental, Security, Legislative, Supply Chain Logistics and Marketing Initiatives.

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2015 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA