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Supply Chain of the Future

Minimize short-term disruptions to gain the agility needed to take on long-term disruptions.

June 17, 2012

Unpredictability has always been a part of the business climate, though perhaps more so today than ever. And its consequences, especially on the supply chain, have never been more dramatic.

Weather patterns, for example, are volatile to a degree unheard of just a few years ago. Supply chains, once largely domestic, now circle the globe. As a result, a weather or other event often leads to monumental supply-chain disruptions. In fact, a single local event can generate global consequences that last for months.

Increasingly, companies will need flexibility to adapt to short-term disruptions or they will be unable to effectively plan for the future. Supply chain planning is not built solely on projections but on the ability to handle the unexpected events that occur on an ongoing basis.


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