Wayne Johnson named 2010 NITL executive of the year

Wayne Johnson, the 2010 NITL Logistics Executive of the Year, remains on the cutting edge of legislative reform. As he enters the next stage of his distinguished career, Johnson chairs the NITL’s Highway Committee and continues to share his knowledge with a new generation of shippers.

<p>“ My advice to anyone is to always review your position as it relates to your department and/or company positions. Get to know the various departments outside your area and their perspectives on transportation and other vital issues.”</p>

“ My advice to anyone is to always review your position as it relates to your department and/or company positions. Get to know the various departments outside your area and their perspectives on transportation and other vital issues.”

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The first thing one notices about Wayne Johnson is that he’s still a man on the move. Given the number of professional responsibilities he has been charged with over the course of his career, this should hardly come as a surprise. But perhaps his most distinguished feature, say his colleagues, is that he always takes the high road in any task or negotiation—a noble characteristic that has earned him the respect of the industry at large.

Johnson is presently the manager of carrier relations for Owens Corning, headquartered in Toledo, Ohio. For over 34 years he has worked in the field of logistics and transportation as a shipper, a carrier executive, and an educator. He has over 29 years of management responsibility with Fortune 100 companies in the United States and Mexico and worked with Landstar in Philadelphia for five years. Johnson also brings eight years of teaching experience in transportation and accounting to the table.

On top of his daily commitments over the years, he’s found time to be the Chairman of the National Industrial Transportation League’s (NITL) Highway Committee, serve on the League’s Board of Directors, and remain an active member of its Rail Committee.

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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at [email protected]

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